Deconditioning, fatigue and impaired quality of life in long-term survivors after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

Deconditioning, fatigue and impaired quality of life in long-term survivors after allogeneic... Long–term survivors after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) are at high risk for treatment-related adverse events, that may worsen physical capacity and may induce fatigue and disability. The aims of this prospective study were to evaluate exercise capacity in allotransplant survivors and its relationship with fatigue and disability. Patient-reported outcomes and exercise capacity were evaluated in 71 non-relapse patients 1 year after allo-HSCT, using validated questionnaires, cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) with measure of peak oxygen uptake (peakVO2) and deconditioning, pulmonary function testing, echocardiography and 6-min walk test. A high proportion (75.4%) of allo-HSCT survivors showed abnormal cardiopulmonary exercise testing parameters as compared to predicted normal values, including 49.3% patients who exhibited moderate to severe impairment in exercise capacity and 37.7% patients with physical deconditioning. PeakVO2 values were not accurately predicted by 6-min walk distances (r = 0.53). Disability and fatigue were strongly associated with decreased peakVO2 values (p = 0.002 and p = 0.008, respectively). Exercise capacity was reduced in most allo-HSCT long-term survivors. Because reduced exercise capacity was associated with fatigue, disability and a decrease in quality of life, cardiopulmonary exercise testing should be performed in every patient who reports fatigue and disability. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bone Marrow Transplantation Springer Journals
Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/deconditioning-fatigue-and-impaired-quality-of-life-in-long-term-e0OPu6GBI8
Publisher
Nature Publishing Group UK
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s) 2017, under exclusive licence to Macmillan Publishers Limited, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Medicine/Public Health, general; Internal Medicine; Cell Biology; Public Health; Hematology; Stem Cells
ISSN
0268-3369
eISSN
1476-5365
D.O.I.
10.1038/s41409-017-0057-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Long–term survivors after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) are at high risk for treatment-related adverse events, that may worsen physical capacity and may induce fatigue and disability. The aims of this prospective study were to evaluate exercise capacity in allotransplant survivors and its relationship with fatigue and disability. Patient-reported outcomes and exercise capacity were evaluated in 71 non-relapse patients 1 year after allo-HSCT, using validated questionnaires, cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) with measure of peak oxygen uptake (peakVO2) and deconditioning, pulmonary function testing, echocardiography and 6-min walk test. A high proportion (75.4%) of allo-HSCT survivors showed abnormal cardiopulmonary exercise testing parameters as compared to predicted normal values, including 49.3% patients who exhibited moderate to severe impairment in exercise capacity and 37.7% patients with physical deconditioning. PeakVO2 values were not accurately predicted by 6-min walk distances (r = 0.53). Disability and fatigue were strongly associated with decreased peakVO2 values (p = 0.002 and p = 0.008, respectively). Exercise capacity was reduced in most allo-HSCT long-term survivors. Because reduced exercise capacity was associated with fatigue, disability and a decrease in quality of life, cardiopulmonary exercise testing should be performed in every patient who reports fatigue and disability.

Journal

Bone Marrow TransplantationSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 21, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off