Decomposition of ultrasonically welded carbon fiber/polyamide 66 and its effect on weld quality

Decomposition of ultrasonically welded carbon fiber/polyamide 66 and its effect on weld quality Ultrasonic welding of 4 mm thick carbon fiber/polyamide 66 (C f /PA 66) composite samples in a lap configuration was completed to characterize the effect of weld energy on weld strength. In general, it was seen that weld strength was proportional to weld energy; however, with excessive energy, the weld strength decreased. Weld indentation had little influence on joint strength, whereas thermal decomposition of C f /PA 66 composite was the main reason for the low joint strength. Higher weld energy caused thermal decomposition of C f /PA 66 composite and degradation of tensile strength of welded workpieces. A decomposition index of the joint was proposed and calculated to predict weld quality. When the decomposition index was small, joint strength increased with the weld area while high decomposition index of polyamide 66 (i.e. >30.5%) led to the decrease in joint strength based on the experimental data. The optimal decomposition index was found in the range of 12–30.5% depending on joint strength. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Welding in the World Springer Journals

Decomposition of ultrasonically welded carbon fiber/polyamide 66 and its effect on weld quality

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by International Institute of Welding
Subject
Materials Science; Metallic Materials; Continuum Mechanics and Mechanics of Materials; Theoretical and Applied Mechanics
ISSN
0043-2288
eISSN
1878-6669
D.O.I.
10.1007/s40194-017-0482-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ultrasonic welding of 4 mm thick carbon fiber/polyamide 66 (C f /PA 66) composite samples in a lap configuration was completed to characterize the effect of weld energy on weld strength. In general, it was seen that weld strength was proportional to weld energy; however, with excessive energy, the weld strength decreased. Weld indentation had little influence on joint strength, whereas thermal decomposition of C f /PA 66 composite was the main reason for the low joint strength. Higher weld energy caused thermal decomposition of C f /PA 66 composite and degradation of tensile strength of welded workpieces. A decomposition index of the joint was proposed and calculated to predict weld quality. When the decomposition index was small, joint strength increased with the weld area while high decomposition index of polyamide 66 (i.e. >30.5%) led to the decrease in joint strength based on the experimental data. The optimal decomposition index was found in the range of 12–30.5% depending on joint strength.

Journal

Welding in the WorldSpringer Journals

Published: May 12, 2017

References

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