Cytogenetic study of recurrent miscarriages and their parents

Cytogenetic study of recurrent miscarriages and their parents There is substantial evidence that genetic alterations are contributing factors to the risk for recurrent miscarriages. This study was conducted to determine the frequency and contribution of chromosomal abnormalities in miscarriages and in couples with recurrent miscarriages. We studied a total of 41 miscarriages and their parents with a history of 2–11 recurrent miscarriages. Chromosomal analysis from chorionic villus sampling (CVS) and fetal tissues were performed according to standard cytogenetic methods using G-banding technique. Major chromosomal aberrations and polymorphic variants were found in 51 and 4.8%, respectively. The chromosomal abnormalities were structural (34.4%) and numerical (65.1%) of which 26.1, 21.7, 8.7 and 8.7% were fetal sex aneuploid, triploid, mosaics and trisomic, respectively. Unbalanced and balanced rearrangements were found in 17.2 and 8.6% of all abnormalities, respectively. Major chromosomal abnormalities in couples were seen in 4.9%. The chromosomal abnormalities associated with pregnancy losses and recurrent miscarriages are mostly numerical ones. The incidence of balanced translocations found here is 4.9% which is near to the mode (about 3–6%) observed in the previous studies. Those frequencies are greater than in the general population (0.3%). This indicates that balanced translocations, seen in parents, have some importance in causing miscarriage. The major parental chromosomal aberrations are significantly associated with fetal wastage. Mosaicism should be taken into account for cytogenetic analyses of pregnancy losses. Thus, cytogenetic analyses should be recommended in couples with recurrent miscarriages, when clinical data fail to clarify the cause. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Genetics Springer Journals

Cytogenetic study of recurrent miscarriages and their parents

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Publisher
Nauka/Interperiodica
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by Pleiades Publishing, Inc.
Subject
Biomedicine; Human Genetics; Animal Genetics and Genomics; Microbial Genetics and Genomics
ISSN
1022-7954
eISSN
1608-3369
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1022795407040138
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There is substantial evidence that genetic alterations are contributing factors to the risk for recurrent miscarriages. This study was conducted to determine the frequency and contribution of chromosomal abnormalities in miscarriages and in couples with recurrent miscarriages. We studied a total of 41 miscarriages and their parents with a history of 2–11 recurrent miscarriages. Chromosomal analysis from chorionic villus sampling (CVS) and fetal tissues were performed according to standard cytogenetic methods using G-banding technique. Major chromosomal aberrations and polymorphic variants were found in 51 and 4.8%, respectively. The chromosomal abnormalities were structural (34.4%) and numerical (65.1%) of which 26.1, 21.7, 8.7 and 8.7% were fetal sex aneuploid, triploid, mosaics and trisomic, respectively. Unbalanced and balanced rearrangements were found in 17.2 and 8.6% of all abnormalities, respectively. Major chromosomal abnormalities in couples were seen in 4.9%. The chromosomal abnormalities associated with pregnancy losses and recurrent miscarriages are mostly numerical ones. The incidence of balanced translocations found here is 4.9% which is near to the mode (about 3–6%) observed in the previous studies. Those frequencies are greater than in the general population (0.3%). This indicates that balanced translocations, seen in parents, have some importance in causing miscarriage. The major parental chromosomal aberrations are significantly associated with fetal wastage. Mosaicism should be taken into account for cytogenetic analyses of pregnancy losses. Thus, cytogenetic analyses should be recommended in couples with recurrent miscarriages, when clinical data fail to clarify the cause.

Journal

Russian Journal of GeneticsSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 20, 2007

References

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