Cyclosporine A responsive congenital nephrotic syndrome with single heterozygous variants in NPHS1, NPHS2, and PLCE1

Cyclosporine A responsive congenital nephrotic syndrome with single heterozygous variants in... Background Congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNS) is primarily a monogenetic disease, with the majority of cases due to changes in five different genes: the nephrin (NPHS1), podocin (NPHS2), Wilms tumor 1 (WT1), laminin ß2 (LAMB2), and phospholipase Cepsilon 1(PLCE1, NPHS3) gene. Usually CNS is not responsive to immunosuppressive therapy, but treatment with ACE inhibitors, AT1 receptor blockade and/or indomethacin can reduce proteinuria. If the disease progresses to end-stage renal disease, kidney transplantation is the therapy of choice. Case-Diagnosis Here, we present the case of a 4-month-old girl with congenital nephrotic syndrome. Upon admission, the patient presented with life-threatening anasarca, hypoalbuminemia, proteinuria, and impaired growth. There was no evidence of an infectious or immunological etiology. The genetic evaluation revealed a heterozygous variant in NPHS1 (p.Arg207Trp), in NPHS2 (p.Ser95Phe) as well as in PLCE1 (p.Ala1045Ser) and did not explain CNS. In addition to daily parenteral albumin infusions plus furosemide, a pharmacological antiproteinuric therapy was started to reduce protein excretion. Based on the genetic results, immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone was initiated, but without response. However, following cyclo- sporine A treatment, the patient achieved complete remission and now has good renal function, growth, and development. Conclusions A profound search for the cause of CNS http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pediatric Nephrology Springer Journals

Cyclosporine A responsive congenital nephrotic syndrome with single heterozygous variants in NPHS1, NPHS2, and PLCE1

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/cyclosporine-a-responsive-congenital-nephrotic-syndrome-with-single-NInhep4nPe
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by IPNA
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Pediatrics; Nephrology; Urology
ISSN
0931-041X
eISSN
1432-198X
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00467-018-3961-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background Congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNS) is primarily a monogenetic disease, with the majority of cases due to changes in five different genes: the nephrin (NPHS1), podocin (NPHS2), Wilms tumor 1 (WT1), laminin ß2 (LAMB2), and phospholipase Cepsilon 1(PLCE1, NPHS3) gene. Usually CNS is not responsive to immunosuppressive therapy, but treatment with ACE inhibitors, AT1 receptor blockade and/or indomethacin can reduce proteinuria. If the disease progresses to end-stage renal disease, kidney transplantation is the therapy of choice. Case-Diagnosis Here, we present the case of a 4-month-old girl with congenital nephrotic syndrome. Upon admission, the patient presented with life-threatening anasarca, hypoalbuminemia, proteinuria, and impaired growth. There was no evidence of an infectious or immunological etiology. The genetic evaluation revealed a heterozygous variant in NPHS1 (p.Arg207Trp), in NPHS2 (p.Ser95Phe) as well as in PLCE1 (p.Ala1045Ser) and did not explain CNS. In addition to daily parenteral albumin infusions plus furosemide, a pharmacological antiproteinuric therapy was started to reduce protein excretion. Based on the genetic results, immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone was initiated, but without response. However, following cyclo- sporine A treatment, the patient achieved complete remission and now has good renal function, growth, and development. Conclusions A profound search for the cause of CNS

Journal

Pediatric NephrologySpringer Journals

Published: Apr 16, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off