Cyclic AMP deficiency negatively affects cell growth and enhances stress-related responses in tobacco Bright Yellow-2 cells

Cyclic AMP deficiency negatively affects cell growth and enhances stress-related responses in... Cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) is a recognized second messenger; however, knowledge of cAMP involvement in plant physiological processes originates primarily from pharmacological studies. To obtain direct evidence for cAMP function in plants, tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells were transformed with the cAMP sponge, which is a genetically encoded tool that reduces cAMP availability. BY-2 cells expressing the cAMP sponge (cAS cells), showed low levels of free cAMP and exhibited growth inhibition that was not proportional to the cAMP sponge transcript level. Growth inhibition in cAS cells was closely related to the precocious inhibition of mitosis due to a delay in cell cycle progression. The cAMP deficiency also enhanced antioxidant systems. Remarkable changes occurred in the cAS proteomic profile compared with that of wild-type (WT) cells. Proteins involved in translation, cytoskeletal organization, and cell proliferation were down-regulated, whereas stress-related proteins were up-regulated in cAS cells. These results support the hypothesis that BY-2 cells sense cAMP deficiency as a stress condition. Finally, many proteasome subunits were differentially expressed in cAS cells compared with WT cells, indicating that cAMP signaling broadly affects protein degradation via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

Cyclic AMP deficiency negatively affects cell growth and enhances stress-related responses in tobacco Bright Yellow-2 cells

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Plant Pathology
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11103-016-0431-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) is a recognized second messenger; however, knowledge of cAMP involvement in plant physiological processes originates primarily from pharmacological studies. To obtain direct evidence for cAMP function in plants, tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells were transformed with the cAMP sponge, which is a genetically encoded tool that reduces cAMP availability. BY-2 cells expressing the cAMP sponge (cAS cells), showed low levels of free cAMP and exhibited growth inhibition that was not proportional to the cAMP sponge transcript level. Growth inhibition in cAS cells was closely related to the precocious inhibition of mitosis due to a delay in cell cycle progression. The cAMP deficiency also enhanced antioxidant systems. Remarkable changes occurred in the cAS proteomic profile compared with that of wild-type (WT) cells. Proteins involved in translation, cytoskeletal organization, and cell proliferation were down-regulated, whereas stress-related proteins were up-regulated in cAS cells. These results support the hypothesis that BY-2 cells sense cAMP deficiency as a stress condition. Finally, many proteasome subunits were differentially expressed in cAS cells compared with WT cells, indicating that cAMP signaling broadly affects protein degradation via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway.

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jan 19, 2016

References

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