Current techniques in the post-operative monitoring of microvascular free-tissue transfers

Current techniques in the post-operative monitoring of microvascular free-tissue transfers Accurate assessment of the perfusion of free-tissue transfers has always been a challenge for surgeons undertaking microvascular reconstructive procedures. Microvascular free-tissue transfer today has a high success rate, which is partly due to the monitoring of flap circulation post-operatively. Recent advances in technology and improvements in surgical technique have led to reported success rates of between 95% and 98%. The aim of post-operative surveillance is the early recognition of flap compromise to improve chances of flap salvage and lower morbidity and mortality rates. There is extensive literature available on post-operative monitoring, and, although many techniques to assess flap perfusion have been described, a standard, reliable, universally accepted method, other than bedside clinical observation by the medical and nursing staff, remains elusive. This review outlines the current clinical and experimental flap monitoring methods available. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Plastic Surgery Springer Journals

Current techniques in the post-operative monitoring of microvascular free-tissue transfers

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/current-techniques-in-the-post-operative-monitoring-of-microvascular-kXTtDVSBoa
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Plastic Surgery
ISSN
0930-343X
eISSN
1435-0130
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00238-004-0680-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Accurate assessment of the perfusion of free-tissue transfers has always been a challenge for surgeons undertaking microvascular reconstructive procedures. Microvascular free-tissue transfer today has a high success rate, which is partly due to the monitoring of flap circulation post-operatively. Recent advances in technology and improvements in surgical technique have led to reported success rates of between 95% and 98%. The aim of post-operative surveillance is the early recognition of flap compromise to improve chances of flap salvage and lower morbidity and mortality rates. There is extensive literature available on post-operative monitoring, and, although many techniques to assess flap perfusion have been described, a standard, reliable, universally accepted method, other than bedside clinical observation by the medical and nursing staff, remains elusive. This review outlines the current clinical and experimental flap monitoring methods available.

Journal

European Journal of Plastic SurgerySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 1, 2005

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off