Cross-sectional and Prospective Examination of Weight Misperception and Depressive Symptoms Among Youth with Overweight and Obesity

Cross-sectional and Prospective Examination of Weight Misperception and Depressive Symptoms Among... This study aims to determine the association between weight misperception (considering oneself average or underweight) and depressive symptoms among youth with overweight/obesity. Linear regression models (adjusted for age, BMI, parental education, percent poverty) were used to examine cross-sectional (wave II, 1996, n = 3898, M age = 15.9, SD = 0.13) and longitudinal (from wave II to IV, 1996–2008/2009, n = 2738, M age = 28.5, SD = 0.06) associations between weight misperception and depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale) in a subsample of White, Black, Asian, Hispanic, and Multi-racial male and female youth with overweight/obesity participating in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Average BMI was 29.0 (0.16) at wave II and 35.7 (0.23) at wave IV. Thirty-two percent misperceived their weight status as average weight (n = 1151, 30 %) or underweight (n = 99, 3 %). In fully adjusted cross-sectional models, White (β = −1.92, 95 % CI = −2.79, −1.06) and Multi-racial (β = −4.43, 95 % CI = −6.90, −1.95) youth who perceived themselves as average weight had significantly lower depressive symptoms compared to accurate weight-perceivers. In fully adjusted longitudinal models, White youth (β = −0.41, 95 % CI = −0.81, −0.004) who perceived themselves as average weight had significantly lower depressive symptoms 12 years later. Findings suggest that weight misperception may be protective against depression among White adolescents and young adults with overweight/obesity. Clinical and population interventions should consider potential harmful effects of correcting weight misperceptions on the mental health of youth with overweight/obesity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Prevention Science Springer Journals

Cross-sectional and Prospective Examination of Weight Misperception and Depressive Symptoms Among Youth with Overweight and Obesity

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by Society for Prevention Research
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Public Health; Health Psychology; Child and School Psychology
ISSN
1389-4986
eISSN
1573-6695
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11121-016-0714-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study aims to determine the association between weight misperception (considering oneself average or underweight) and depressive symptoms among youth with overweight/obesity. Linear regression models (adjusted for age, BMI, parental education, percent poverty) were used to examine cross-sectional (wave II, 1996, n = 3898, M age = 15.9, SD = 0.13) and longitudinal (from wave II to IV, 1996–2008/2009, n = 2738, M age = 28.5, SD = 0.06) associations between weight misperception and depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale) in a subsample of White, Black, Asian, Hispanic, and Multi-racial male and female youth with overweight/obesity participating in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Average BMI was 29.0 (0.16) at wave II and 35.7 (0.23) at wave IV. Thirty-two percent misperceived their weight status as average weight (n = 1151, 30 %) or underweight (n = 99, 3 %). In fully adjusted cross-sectional models, White (β = −1.92, 95 % CI = −2.79, −1.06) and Multi-racial (β = −4.43, 95 % CI = −6.90, −1.95) youth who perceived themselves as average weight had significantly lower depressive symptoms compared to accurate weight-perceivers. In fully adjusted longitudinal models, White youth (β = −0.41, 95 % CI = −0.81, −0.004) who perceived themselves as average weight had significantly lower depressive symptoms 12 years later. Findings suggest that weight misperception may be protective against depression among White adolescents and young adults with overweight/obesity. Clinical and population interventions should consider potential harmful effects of correcting weight misperceptions on the mental health of youth with overweight/obesity.

Journal

Prevention ScienceSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 28, 2016

References

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