Crop water status assessment in controlled environment using crop reflectance and temperature measurements

Crop water status assessment in controlled environment using crop reflectance and temperature... Crop water status is an important parameter for plant growth and yield performance in greenhouses. Thus, early detection of water stress is essential for efficient crop management. The dynamic response of plants to changes of their environment is called ‘speaking plant’ and multisensory platforms for remote sensing measurements offer the possibility to monitor in real-time the crop health status without affecting the crop and environmental conditions. Therefore, aim of this work was to use crop reflectance and temperature measurements acquired remotely for crop water status assessment. Two different irrigation treatments were imposed in tomato plants grown in slabs filed with perlite, namely tomato plants under no irrigation for a certain period; and well-watered plants. The plants were grown in a controlled growth chamber and measurements were carried out during August and September of 2014. Crop reflectance measurements were carried out by two types of sensors: (i) a multispectral camera measuring the radiation reflected in three spectral bands centred between 590–680, 690–830 and 830–1000 nm regions, and (ii) a spectroradiometer measuring the leaf reflected radiation from 350 to 2500 nm. Based on the above measurements several crop indices were calculated. The results showed that crop reflectance increased due to water deficit with the detected reflectance increase being significant about 8 h following irrigation withholding. The results of a first derivative analysis on the reflectance data showed that the spectral regions centred at 490–510, 530–560, 660–670 and 730–760 nm could be used for crop status monitoring. In addition, the results of the present study point out that sphotochemical reflectance index, modified red simple ratio index and modified ratio normalized difference vegetation index could be used as an indicator of plant water stress, since their values were correlated well with the substrate water content and the crop water stress index; the last being extensively used for crop water status assessment in greenhouses and open field. Thus, it could be concluded that reflectance and crop temperature measurements might be combined to provide alarm signals when crop water status reaches critical levels for optimal plant growth. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Precision Agriculture Springer Journals

Crop water status assessment in controlled environment using crop reflectance and temperature measurements

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Life Sciences; Agriculture; Soil Science & Conservation; Remote Sensing/Photogrammetry; Statistics for Engineering, Physics, Computer Science, Chemistry and Earth Sciences; Atmospheric Sciences
ISSN
1385-2256
eISSN
1573-1618
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11119-016-9492-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Crop water status is an important parameter for plant growth and yield performance in greenhouses. Thus, early detection of water stress is essential for efficient crop management. The dynamic response of plants to changes of their environment is called ‘speaking plant’ and multisensory platforms for remote sensing measurements offer the possibility to monitor in real-time the crop health status without affecting the crop and environmental conditions. Therefore, aim of this work was to use crop reflectance and temperature measurements acquired remotely for crop water status assessment. Two different irrigation treatments were imposed in tomato plants grown in slabs filed with perlite, namely tomato plants under no irrigation for a certain period; and well-watered plants. The plants were grown in a controlled growth chamber and measurements were carried out during August and September of 2014. Crop reflectance measurements were carried out by two types of sensors: (i) a multispectral camera measuring the radiation reflected in three spectral bands centred between 590–680, 690–830 and 830–1000 nm regions, and (ii) a spectroradiometer measuring the leaf reflected radiation from 350 to 2500 nm. Based on the above measurements several crop indices were calculated. The results showed that crop reflectance increased due to water deficit with the detected reflectance increase being significant about 8 h following irrigation withholding. The results of a first derivative analysis on the reflectance data showed that the spectral regions centred at 490–510, 530–560, 660–670 and 730–760 nm could be used for crop status monitoring. In addition, the results of the present study point out that sphotochemical reflectance index, modified red simple ratio index and modified ratio normalized difference vegetation index could be used as an indicator of plant water stress, since their values were correlated well with the substrate water content and the crop water stress index; the last being extensively used for crop water status assessment in greenhouses and open field. Thus, it could be concluded that reflectance and crop temperature measurements might be combined to provide alarm signals when crop water status reaches critical levels for optimal plant growth.

Journal

Precision AgricultureSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 2, 2017

References

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