CRISPR-Cas Technology in Plant Science

CRISPR-Cas Technology in Plant Science CRISPR-Cas technology has raised considerable interest among plant scientists, both in basic science and in plant breeding. Presently, the generation of random mutations at a predetermined site of the genome is well mastered, just like the targeted insertion of transgenes, although both remain restricted to species or genotypes amenable for plant transformation. On the other hand, true genome editing, i.e. the deliberate replacement of one or several nucleotides of the genome in a predetermined fashion, is limited to some rather particular examples that generally concern genes allowing positive selection, for example tolerance to herbicides. Therefore, further technological developments are necessary to fully exploit the potential of genome editing in enlarging the gene pool beyond the natural variability available in a given species. In principle, the technology can be applied to any quality related, agronomical or ecological trait, under the condition of upstream knowledge on the genes to be targeted and the precise modifications necessary to improve alleles. Published proof of concepts concern a wide range of agronomical traits, the most frequent being disease resistance, herbicide tolerance and the biochemical composition of harvested products. The regulatory status of the plants obtained by CRISPR-Cas technology raises numerous questions, in particular with regard to the plants that carry in their genomes the punctual modifications caused by the presence of the Cas9 nuclease but not the nuclease itself. Without clarification by the competent authorities, CRISPR-Cas technology would continue to be a powerful tool in functional genomics, but its potential in plant breeding would remain untapped. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Potato Research Springer Journals

CRISPR-Cas Technology in Plant Science

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/crispr-cas-technology-in-plant-science-feI4dxEpzt
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by European Association for Potato Research
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences; Agriculture; Plant Genetics and Genomics; Plant Systematics/Taxonomy/Biogeography
ISSN
0014-3065
eISSN
1871-4528
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11540-018-9387-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CRISPR-Cas technology has raised considerable interest among plant scientists, both in basic science and in plant breeding. Presently, the generation of random mutations at a predetermined site of the genome is well mastered, just like the targeted insertion of transgenes, although both remain restricted to species or genotypes amenable for plant transformation. On the other hand, true genome editing, i.e. the deliberate replacement of one or several nucleotides of the genome in a predetermined fashion, is limited to some rather particular examples that generally concern genes allowing positive selection, for example tolerance to herbicides. Therefore, further technological developments are necessary to fully exploit the potential of genome editing in enlarging the gene pool beyond the natural variability available in a given species. In principle, the technology can be applied to any quality related, agronomical or ecological trait, under the condition of upstream knowledge on the genes to be targeted and the precise modifications necessary to improve alleles. Published proof of concepts concern a wide range of agronomical traits, the most frequent being disease resistance, herbicide tolerance and the biochemical composition of harvested products. The regulatory status of the plants obtained by CRISPR-Cas technology raises numerous questions, in particular with regard to the plants that carry in their genomes the punctual modifications caused by the presence of the Cas9 nuclease but not the nuclease itself. Without clarification by the competent authorities, CRISPR-Cas technology would continue to be a powerful tool in functional genomics, but its potential in plant breeding would remain untapped.

Journal

Potato ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off