Counseling in urogynecology: A difficult task, or simply good surgeon–patient communication?

Counseling in urogynecology: A difficult task, or simply good surgeon–patient communication? Surgical treatments for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary incontinence (UI) have greatly changed in recent years. Prompted by increases in reports of adverse outcomes in relation to such treatments, several scientific societies and researchers have emphasized providing patients with thorough counseling before treating them. Patient-centered communication has become the gold standard for excellence in clinical care. This challenges clinicians to be cognizant of their patients’ perspectives, motivations, expectations, fears, concerns, and social contexts to enable them to reach a shared understanding with patients. Considering this, urogynecology counseling represents a crucial process through which women can gain a clear understanding of their clinical condition and the risks and benefits of potential treatment options. However, many urogynecologists believe that proposing a treatment and providing only enough detail to secure informed consent constitutes counseling. This article is intended to describe good counseling for women undergoing urogynecological surgery and to suggest optimal methodologies for implementation. . . . Keywords Counseling Urogynecology Urinary incontinence Pelvic organ prolapse Introduction motivations, expectations, fears, concerns, and social contexts to enable them to reach a shared understanding with patients [2–4]. A cross-sectional study of the Swedish National Register Surgical treatments for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and uri- http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Urogynecology Journal Springer Journals

Counseling in urogynecology: A difficult task, or simply good surgeon–patient communication?

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Publisher
Springer London
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by The International Urogynecological Association
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Gynecology; Urology
ISSN
0937-3462
eISSN
1433-3023
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00192-018-3673-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Surgical treatments for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary incontinence (UI) have greatly changed in recent years. Prompted by increases in reports of adverse outcomes in relation to such treatments, several scientific societies and researchers have emphasized providing patients with thorough counseling before treating them. Patient-centered communication has become the gold standard for excellence in clinical care. This challenges clinicians to be cognizant of their patients’ perspectives, motivations, expectations, fears, concerns, and social contexts to enable them to reach a shared understanding with patients. Considering this, urogynecology counseling represents a crucial process through which women can gain a clear understanding of their clinical condition and the risks and benefits of potential treatment options. However, many urogynecologists believe that proposing a treatment and providing only enough detail to secure informed consent constitutes counseling. This article is intended to describe good counseling for women undergoing urogynecological surgery and to suggest optimal methodologies for implementation. . . . Keywords Counseling Urogynecology Urinary incontinence Pelvic organ prolapse Introduction motivations, expectations, fears, concerns, and social contexts to enable them to reach a shared understanding with patients [2–4]. A cross-sectional study of the Swedish National Register Surgical treatments for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and uri-

Journal

International Urogynecology JournalSpringer Journals

Published: May 29, 2018

References

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