Correlation of Disk Topography Waves with Nanometer-Scale Lubricant Moguls and Magnetic Head Media Spacing

Correlation of Disk Topography Waves with Nanometer-Scale Lubricant Moguls and Magnetic Head... Magnetic recording disk carbon overcoats are lubricated with nanometer-thick films of perfluoropolyether lubricant. It is well-known that lubricant thickness redistribution takes place due to air shear stress oscillation at air bearing resonant frequencies and also due to shear stress oscillation induced by disk topography waves on test tracks. We extended this work to demonstrate correlation between surface topography and lubricant redistribution on whole disk surfaces. Lubricant moguls are shown to form over regions of the disk surface which have topography waves that are half the slider length, and the lubricant thickness peak is out-of-phase down track from the topography peak height. There is a critical relative humidity above 20% beyond which moguls are readily formed by the slider flying at 10 nm without thermal fly-height control. The significance of the lubricant redistribution for drive magnetic performance has long been the subject of debate. The slider flying height modulation measured by magnetic head media spacing was in good agreement with the dynamic air bearing simulation based on the measured disk surface topography. Measured head media spacing image data on the same disk surface before and after lubricant redistribution had the same length scale as the correlation between topography and lubricant thickness variation. These results demonstrate that lubricant thickness redistribution on the order of atomic diameters can degrade magnetic performance, and that the surface topography waves alone can degrade areal density by as much as 2%. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tribology Letters Springer Journals

Correlation of Disk Topography Waves with Nanometer-Scale Lubricant Moguls and Magnetic Head Media Spacing

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Materials Science; Tribology, Corrosion and Coatings; Surfaces and Interfaces, Thin Films; Theoretical and Applied Mechanics; Physical Chemistry; Nanotechnology
ISSN
1023-8883
eISSN
1573-2711
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11249-017-0907-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Magnetic recording disk carbon overcoats are lubricated with nanometer-thick films of perfluoropolyether lubricant. It is well-known that lubricant thickness redistribution takes place due to air shear stress oscillation at air bearing resonant frequencies and also due to shear stress oscillation induced by disk topography waves on test tracks. We extended this work to demonstrate correlation between surface topography and lubricant redistribution on whole disk surfaces. Lubricant moguls are shown to form over regions of the disk surface which have topography waves that are half the slider length, and the lubricant thickness peak is out-of-phase down track from the topography peak height. There is a critical relative humidity above 20% beyond which moguls are readily formed by the slider flying at 10 nm without thermal fly-height control. The significance of the lubricant redistribution for drive magnetic performance has long been the subject of debate. The slider flying height modulation measured by magnetic head media spacing was in good agreement with the dynamic air bearing simulation based on the measured disk surface topography. Measured head media spacing image data on the same disk surface before and after lubricant redistribution had the same length scale as the correlation between topography and lubricant thickness variation. These results demonstrate that lubricant thickness redistribution on the order of atomic diameters can degrade magnetic performance, and that the surface topography waves alone can degrade areal density by as much as 2%.

Journal

Tribology LettersSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 17, 2017

References

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