Correction to: Antipsychotics and dementia in Canada: a retrospective cross-sectional study of four health sectors

Correction to: Antipsychotics and dementia in Canada: a retrospective cross-sectional study of... Rios et al. BMC Geriatrics (2018) 18:128 https://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-018-0819-y CORRECTION Open Access Correction to: Antipsychotics and dementia in Canada: a retrospective cross-sectional study of four health sectors 1 1* 2,3 1,2 1 4 Sebastian Rios , Christopher M. Perlman , Andrew Costa , George Heckman , John P. Hirdes and Lori Mitchell Institute for Aging, Waterloo, ON, Canada. Department of Clinical Correction Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Following the publication of this article [1], the authors 4 ON, Canada. Winnipeg Regional Health Authority (WRHA) Home Care noticed that the results presented in the results section Program, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. of the article were erroneously reported in the results Received: 17 May 2018 Accepted: 17 May 2018 section of the abstract. This correction shows both the incorrect and correct values for the results section in the Reference abstract. 1. Rios, et al. BMC Geriatr. 2017;17:244. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-017- The incorrect version is: 0636-8. The total prevalence of antipsychotic use among older adults with dementia was 26% in HC, 54% in ALC, 41% in CCC, and 48% in LTC. This prevalence ranged from 38% (HC) to 73% (ALC) for those with both behavioral and psychotic symptoms and from 15% (HC) to 31% (ALC) among those with no symptoms. The regression models identified a number of variables were related to anti- psychotic use in the absence of behavior or psychotic symptoms, such as bipolar disorder (OR = 6.63 in CCC; OR = 5.52 in LTC), anxious complaints (OR = 1.54 in LTC to 2.01 in CCC), and wandering (OR = 1.83 in ALC). The corrected version is: The total prevalence of antipsychotic use among older adults with dementia was 19% in HC, 42% in ALC, 35% in CCC, and 37% in LTC. This prevalence ranged from 39% (HC) to 70% (ALC) for those with both behavioral and psychotic symptoms and from 12% (HC) to 32% (ALC) among those with no symptoms. The regression models identified a number of variables were related to antipsychotic use in the absence of behavior or psychotic symptoms, such as bipolar disorder (OR = 5.63 in CCC; OR = 5.52 in LTC), anxious complaints (OR = 1.54 in LTC to 2.01 in CCC), and wandering (OR = 1.83 in ALC). Author details School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave W, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada. Schlegel Research * Correspondence: chris.perlman@uwaterloo.ca School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave W, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada Full list of author information is available at the end of the article © The Author(s). 2018 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png BMC Geriatrics Springer Journals

Correction to: Antipsychotics and dementia in Canada: a retrospective cross-sectional study of four health sectors

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Publisher
BioMed Central
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by The Author(s).
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Geriatrics/Gerontology; Aging; Rehabilitation
eISSN
1471-2318
D.O.I.
10.1186/s12877-018-0819-y
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Abstract

Rios et al. BMC Geriatrics (2018) 18:128 https://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-018-0819-y CORRECTION Open Access Correction to: Antipsychotics and dementia in Canada: a retrospective cross-sectional study of four health sectors 1 1* 2,3 1,2 1 4 Sebastian Rios , Christopher M. Perlman , Andrew Costa , George Heckman , John P. Hirdes and Lori Mitchell Institute for Aging, Waterloo, ON, Canada. Department of Clinical Correction Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Following the publication of this article [1], the authors 4 ON, Canada. Winnipeg Regional Health Authority (WRHA) Home Care noticed that the results presented in the results section Program, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. of the article were erroneously reported in the results Received: 17 May 2018 Accepted: 17 May 2018 section of the abstract. This correction shows both the incorrect and correct values for the results section in the Reference abstract. 1. Rios, et al. BMC Geriatr. 2017;17:244. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-017- The incorrect version is: 0636-8. The total prevalence of antipsychotic use among older adults with dementia was 26% in HC, 54% in ALC, 41% in CCC, and 48% in LTC. This prevalence ranged from 38% (HC) to 73% (ALC) for those with both behavioral and psychotic symptoms and from 15% (HC) to 31% (ALC) among those with no symptoms. The regression models identified a number of variables were related to anti- psychotic use in the absence of behavior or psychotic symptoms, such as bipolar disorder (OR = 6.63 in CCC; OR = 5.52 in LTC), anxious complaints (OR = 1.54 in LTC to 2.01 in CCC), and wandering (OR = 1.83 in ALC). The corrected version is: The total prevalence of antipsychotic use among older adults with dementia was 19% in HC, 42% in ALC, 35% in CCC, and 37% in LTC. This prevalence ranged from 39% (HC) to 70% (ALC) for those with both behavioral and psychotic symptoms and from 12% (HC) to 32% (ALC) among those with no symptoms. The regression models identified a number of variables were related to antipsychotic use in the absence of behavior or psychotic symptoms, such as bipolar disorder (OR = 5.63 in CCC; OR = 5.52 in LTC), anxious complaints (OR = 1.54 in LTC to 2.01 in CCC), and wandering (OR = 1.83 in ALC). Author details School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave W, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada. Schlegel Research * Correspondence: chris.perlman@uwaterloo.ca School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave W, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada Full list of author information is available at the end of the article © The Author(s). 2018 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Journal

BMC GeriatricsSpringer Journals

Published: May 31, 2018

References

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