Cooling Algorithms Based on the 3-bit Majority

Cooling Algorithms Based on the 3-bit Majority Algorithmic cooling is a potentially important technique for making scalable NMR quantum computation feasible in practice. Given the constraints imposed by this approach to quantum computing, the most likely cooling algorithms to be practicable are those based on simple reversible polarization compression (RPC) operations acting locally on small numbers of bits. Several different algorithms using 2- and 3-bit RPC operations have appeared in the literature, and these are the algorithms I consider in this note. Specifically, I show that the RPC operation used in all these algorithms is essentially a majority vote of 3 bits, and prove the optimality of the best such algorithm. I go on to derive some theoretical bounds on the performance of these algorithms under some specific assumptions about errors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quantum Information Processing Springer Journals

Cooling Algorithms Based on the 3-bit Majority

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Physics; Quantum Information Technology, Spintronics; Quantum Computing; Data Structures, Cryptology and Information Theory; Quantum Physics; Mathematical Physics
ISSN
1570-0755
eISSN
1573-1332
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11128-007-0059-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Algorithmic cooling is a potentially important technique for making scalable NMR quantum computation feasible in practice. Given the constraints imposed by this approach to quantum computing, the most likely cooling algorithms to be practicable are those based on simple reversible polarization compression (RPC) operations acting locally on small numbers of bits. Several different algorithms using 2- and 3-bit RPC operations have appeared in the literature, and these are the algorithms I consider in this note. Specifically, I show that the RPC operation used in all these algorithms is essentially a majority vote of 3 bits, and prove the optimality of the best such algorithm. I go on to derive some theoretical bounds on the performance of these algorithms under some specific assumptions about errors.

Journal

Quantum Information ProcessingSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 25, 2007

References

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