Controlled temperature chain costsaving for HBV prevention

Controlled temperature chain costsaving for HBV prevention PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News 804, p10 - 2 Jun 2018 Controlled temperature chain cost saving for HBV prevention A controlled temperature chain (CTC) for the delivery of the birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine appears to be cost saving in the prevention of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections in many parts of the world, according to findings of a study published in The Lancet Global Health. A model was used to estimate total HBV-related disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) and costs (vaccine delivery costs and disease-related costs) per 1000 births, with versus without the CTC, in six regions of the world (East Asia and Pacific; South Asia; Central Europe, Eastern Europe and Central Asia; North Africa and Middle East; sub-Saharan Africa; and Latin America and Caribbean) and in 72 countries. Cost effectiveness was assessed from a healthcare system perspective over a lifetime time horizon. The CTC strategy was estimated to achieve health benefits in all six regions compared with no CTC, and was cost saving in four regions: East Asia and Pacific, sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa and Middle East, and Latin America and Caribbean. Cost saving per 1000 births in these regions were $1310, $1920, $1500 and $890, respectively. Estimated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for the CTC strategy versus no CTC ranged from per DALY averted per 1000 births in Central $0.15 Europe, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, to $79.72 in South Asia. The cost effectiveness of CTC was greater in countries with a higher prevalence of HBV, lower birth dose coverage, or later birth dose delivery. "A CTC outreach strategy that improves the timing and coverage of the HBV birth dose vaccination is likely to be cost-saving and reduce the burden of HBV infection associated with perinatal transmission," concluded the authors. "All the benefits of the CTC will never come to fruition if no manufacturer exists with a product licensed and prequalified for CTC use . . . global efforts to support the development of appropriate CTC incentives for manufacturers are needed; additionally, the assessment, quantification, and effective communication of the demand for CTC should be communicated to manufacturers by countries as well as other global stakeholders," said Minal Patel and Anna-Lea Kahn from the WHO, Geneva, Switzerland, in an accompanying comment published in The Lancet Global Health. * 2014 US dollars 1. Scott N, et al. Cost-effectiveness of the controlled temperature chain for the hepatitis B virus birth dose vaccine in various global settings: a modelling study. The Lancet Global Health 6: e659-e667, No. 6, Jun 2018. Available from: URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(18)30219-5. 2. Patel MK, et al. Game changing: hepatitis B vaccine in a controlled temperature chain. The Lancet Global Health 6: e596-e597, No. 6, Jun 2018. Available from: URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(18)30233-X. 1173-5503/18/0804-0001/$14.95 Adis © 2018 Springer International Publishing AG. All rights reserved PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News 2 Jun 2018 No. 804 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News Springer Journals

Controlled temperature chain costsaving for HBV prevention

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Pharmacoeconomics and Health Outcomes; Quality of Life Research; Health Economics; Public Health
ISSN
1173-5503
eISSN
1179-2043
D.O.I.
10.1007/s40274-018-4974-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News 804, p10 - 2 Jun 2018 Controlled temperature chain cost saving for HBV prevention A controlled temperature chain (CTC) for the delivery of the birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine appears to be cost saving in the prevention of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections in many parts of the world, according to findings of a study published in The Lancet Global Health. A model was used to estimate total HBV-related disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) and costs (vaccine delivery costs and disease-related costs) per 1000 births, with versus without the CTC, in six regions of the world (East Asia and Pacific; South Asia; Central Europe, Eastern Europe and Central Asia; North Africa and Middle East; sub-Saharan Africa; and Latin America and Caribbean) and in 72 countries. Cost effectiveness was assessed from a healthcare system perspective over a lifetime time horizon. The CTC strategy was estimated to achieve health benefits in all six regions compared with no CTC, and was cost saving in four regions: East Asia and Pacific, sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa and Middle East, and Latin America and Caribbean. Cost saving per 1000 births in these regions were $1310, $1920, $1500 and $890, respectively. Estimated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for the CTC strategy versus no CTC ranged from per DALY averted per 1000 births in Central $0.15 Europe, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, to $79.72 in South Asia. The cost effectiveness of CTC was greater in countries with a higher prevalence of HBV, lower birth dose coverage, or later birth dose delivery. "A CTC outreach strategy that improves the timing and coverage of the HBV birth dose vaccination is likely to be cost-saving and reduce the burden of HBV infection associated with perinatal transmission," concluded the authors. "All the benefits of the CTC will never come to fruition if no manufacturer exists with a product licensed and prequalified for CTC use . . . global efforts to support the development of appropriate CTC incentives for manufacturers are needed; additionally, the assessment, quantification, and effective communication of the demand for CTC should be communicated to manufacturers by countries as well as other global stakeholders," said Minal Patel and Anna-Lea Kahn from the WHO, Geneva, Switzerland, in an accompanying comment published in The Lancet Global Health. * 2014 US dollars 1. Scott N, et al. Cost-effectiveness of the controlled temperature chain for the hepatitis B virus birth dose vaccine in various global settings: a modelling study. The Lancet Global Health 6: e659-e667, No. 6, Jun 2018. Available from: URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(18)30219-5. 2. Patel MK, et al. Game changing: hepatitis B vaccine in a controlled temperature chain. The Lancet Global Health 6: e596-e597, No. 6, Jun 2018. Available from: URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(18)30233-X. 1173-5503/18/0804-0001/$14.95 Adis © 2018 Springer International Publishing AG. All rights reserved PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News 2 Jun 2018 No. 804

Journal

PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes NewsSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 2, 2018

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