Constitutive melanin density is associated with higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D and potentially total body BMD in older Caucasian adults via increased sun tolerance and exposure

Constitutive melanin density is associated with higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D and potentially total... Summary Greater skin pigmentation reduces dose equivalent cutaneous vitamin D3 production, potentially impacting lifetime vitamin D status and fracture risk. We show that melanin density was positively associated with 25-hydroxyvitamin D and total body bone mineral density. These relationships were partially explained by greater sun exposure due to more permissive skin phenotype. Introduction Higher cutaneous melanin reduces vitamin D3 production. This may impact lifetime vitamin D status and increase fracture risk. This study aimed to describe the relationship between spectrophotometrically determined constitutive melanin density, osteoporotic risk factors and potential intermediaries in a cohort of exclusively older Caucasian adults. Methods One thousand seventy-two community-dwelling adults aged 50–80 years had constitutive melanin density quantified using spectrophotometry. Sun exposure, skin phenotype, non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) prevalence and smoking status were assessed by questionnaire. Bone mineral density (BMD), falls risk, physical activity and 25- hydroxyvitamin D were measured using DXA, the short form Physiological Profile Assessment, pedometer and radio- immunoassay, respectively. Results Higher melanin density was independently associated with greater ability to tan (RR = 1.27, p < 0.001), less propensity to sunburn (RR = 0.92, p < 0.001), fewer lifetime sunburns (RR = 0.94, p = 0.01), current smoking (RR = 1.41, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Osteoporosis International Springer Journals

Constitutive melanin density is associated with higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D and potentially total body BMD in older Caucasian adults via increased sun tolerance and exposure

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/constitutive-melanin-density-is-associated-with-higher-25-srOSf0k0Nu
Publisher
Springer London
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Orthopedics; Endocrinology; Rheumatology
ISSN
0937-941X
eISSN
1433-2965
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00198-018-4568-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Summary Greater skin pigmentation reduces dose equivalent cutaneous vitamin D3 production, potentially impacting lifetime vitamin D status and fracture risk. We show that melanin density was positively associated with 25-hydroxyvitamin D and total body bone mineral density. These relationships were partially explained by greater sun exposure due to more permissive skin phenotype. Introduction Higher cutaneous melanin reduces vitamin D3 production. This may impact lifetime vitamin D status and increase fracture risk. This study aimed to describe the relationship between spectrophotometrically determined constitutive melanin density, osteoporotic risk factors and potential intermediaries in a cohort of exclusively older Caucasian adults. Methods One thousand seventy-two community-dwelling adults aged 50–80 years had constitutive melanin density quantified using spectrophotometry. Sun exposure, skin phenotype, non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) prevalence and smoking status were assessed by questionnaire. Bone mineral density (BMD), falls risk, physical activity and 25- hydroxyvitamin D were measured using DXA, the short form Physiological Profile Assessment, pedometer and radio- immunoassay, respectively. Results Higher melanin density was independently associated with greater ability to tan (RR = 1.27, p < 0.001), less propensity to sunburn (RR = 0.92, p < 0.001), fewer lifetime sunburns (RR = 0.94, p = 0.01), current smoking (RR = 1.41,

Journal

Osteoporosis InternationalSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off