Consistency in Measures of Social Homogeneity: A Connection with Proximity to Single Peaked Preferences

Consistency in Measures of Social Homogeneity: A Connection with Proximity to Single Peaked... A survey of work is presented that is related to the relationship between measures of social homogeneity and probability that a Pairwise Majority Rule Winner (PMRW), or Condorcet Winner, exists. Little evidence has been reported to support the notion of a strong relationship between these two factors. Exact probability representations are derived to show that it is possible to find a parameter that is directly observable from voter profiles that can be systematically changed, so that an expected decrease in social homogeneity will lead to a counterintuitive increase in the expected probability that a PMRW exists. Using a different observable profile parameter that reflects a rough measure of the proximity of profiles to completely single-peaked preferences adds a sufficient degree of consistency among voters' preferences to produce the expected outcome. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality & Quantity Springer Journals

Consistency in Measures of Social Homogeneity: A Connection with Proximity to Single Peaked Preferences

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Social Sciences; Methodology of the Social Sciences; Social Sciences, general
ISSN
0033-5177
eISSN
1573-7845
D.O.I.
10.1023/B:QUQU.0000019391.85976.65
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A survey of work is presented that is related to the relationship between measures of social homogeneity and probability that a Pairwise Majority Rule Winner (PMRW), or Condorcet Winner, exists. Little evidence has been reported to support the notion of a strong relationship between these two factors. Exact probability representations are derived to show that it is possible to find a parameter that is directly observable from voter profiles that can be systematically changed, so that an expected decrease in social homogeneity will lead to a counterintuitive increase in the expected probability that a PMRW exists. Using a different observable profile parameter that reflects a rough measure of the proximity of profiles to completely single-peaked preferences adds a sufficient degree of consistency among voters' preferences to produce the expected outcome.

Journal

Quality & QuantitySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 18, 2004

References

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