Conservation of the E-function for Floral Organ Identity in Rice Revealed by the Analysis of Tissue Culture-induced Loss-of-Function Mutants of the OsMADS1 Gene

Conservation of the E-function for Floral Organ Identity in Rice Revealed by the Analysis of... Rapid progress in studies on flower development has resulted in refining the classical ‘ABC model’ into a new ‘ABCDE model’ to explain properly the regulation of floral organ identity. Conservation of E-function for flower organ identity among the dicotyledonous (dicot) plants has been revealed. However, its conservation in monocotyledonous (monocot) plants remains largely unknown. Here, we show the conservation of E-function in rice (Oryza sativaL.) by characterizing tissue culture-induced mutants of two MADS-box genes, OsMADS1and OsMADS5, which form a subclade within the well-supported clade of SEP-genes (E-function) phylogeny. Severe loss-of-function mutations of OsMADS1cause complete homeotic conversion of organs (lodicules, stamens, and carpels) of three inner whorls into lemma- and palea-like structures. Such basic deformed structure is reiterated along with the pedicel at the center of the same floret, indicating the loss of determinacy of the flower meristem. These phenotypes resemble the phenotypes caused by mutations of the dicot E-class genes, such as the Arabidopsis SEP123(SEPALLATA1/2/3) and the petunia FBP2(Floral Binding Protein 2), suggesting that OsMADS1play a very similar role in rice to that of defined E-class genes in dicot plants. In case of the loss-of-function mutation of OsMADS5, no defect in either panicles or vegetative organs was observed. These results demonstrate that OsMADS1clearly possesses E-function, and so, E-function is fundamentally conserved between dicot plants and rice, a monocot model plant. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

Conservation of the E-function for Floral Organ Identity in Rice Revealed by the Analysis of Tissue Culture-induced Loss-of-Function Mutants of the OsMADS1 Gene

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/conservation-of-the-e-function-for-floral-organ-identity-in-rice-LOtKqmPdDY
Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Springer
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Plant Sciences; Plant Pathology
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11103-005-2161-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Rapid progress in studies on flower development has resulted in refining the classical ‘ABC model’ into a new ‘ABCDE model’ to explain properly the regulation of floral organ identity. Conservation of E-function for flower organ identity among the dicotyledonous (dicot) plants has been revealed. However, its conservation in monocotyledonous (monocot) plants remains largely unknown. Here, we show the conservation of E-function in rice (Oryza sativaL.) by characterizing tissue culture-induced mutants of two MADS-box genes, OsMADS1and OsMADS5, which form a subclade within the well-supported clade of SEP-genes (E-function) phylogeny. Severe loss-of-function mutations of OsMADS1cause complete homeotic conversion of organs (lodicules, stamens, and carpels) of three inner whorls into lemma- and palea-like structures. Such basic deformed structure is reiterated along with the pedicel at the center of the same floret, indicating the loss of determinacy of the flower meristem. These phenotypes resemble the phenotypes caused by mutations of the dicot E-class genes, such as the Arabidopsis SEP123(SEPALLATA1/2/3) and the petunia FBP2(Floral Binding Protein 2), suggesting that OsMADS1play a very similar role in rice to that of defined E-class genes in dicot plants. In case of the loss-of-function mutation of OsMADS5, no defect in either panicles or vegetative organs was observed. These results demonstrate that OsMADS1clearly possesses E-function, and so, E-function is fundamentally conserved between dicot plants and rice, a monocot model plant.

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Feb 11, 2005

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from Google Scholar, PubMed
Create lists to organize your research
Export lists, citations
Access to DeepDyve database
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off