Conflict over non-partitioned resources may explain between-species differences in declines: the anthropogenic competition hypothesis

Conflict over non-partitioned resources may explain between-species differences in declines: the... Human alterations of habitats are causing declines in many Significance statement Understanding the causes of species declines is crucial to species worldwide. The extent of declines varies greatly among closely related species, for often unknown reasons that preventing the losses. Whilst much work on species vulnera- bility shows broad scale effects, an enduring mystery is the must be understood in order to maintain biodiversity. An variation in population trends between closely related species. overlooked factor is that seasonally breeding species compete for nest sites, which are increasingly limited in many anthro- I combined evolutionary modelling with three global-scale long-term data sets to reveal that competition for scarce nest pogenically degraded environments. I used evolutionary game theory to predict the outcome of competition between individ- sites causes variation in declines. The impact of the loss of nest sites on differential declines among closely related spe- uals that differ in their competitive ability and timing of nesting. A range of species following evolutionarily stable cies from very different taxa indicates a new ecological prin- ciple of widespread importance: the effect of habitat degrada- strategies can co-exist when there are sufficient nest sites, but my model predicts that a reduction in nest http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Springer Journals

Conflict over non-partitioned resources may explain between-species differences in declines: the anthropogenic competition hypothesis

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s)
Subject
Life Sciences; Behavioral Sciences; Zoology; Animal Ecology
ISSN
0340-5443
eISSN
1432-0762
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00265-017-2327-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Human alterations of habitats are causing declines in many Significance statement Understanding the causes of species declines is crucial to species worldwide. The extent of declines varies greatly among closely related species, for often unknown reasons that preventing the losses. Whilst much work on species vulnera- bility shows broad scale effects, an enduring mystery is the must be understood in order to maintain biodiversity. An variation in population trends between closely related species. overlooked factor is that seasonally breeding species compete for nest sites, which are increasingly limited in many anthro- I combined evolutionary modelling with three global-scale long-term data sets to reveal that competition for scarce nest pogenically degraded environments. I used evolutionary game theory to predict the outcome of competition between individ- sites causes variation in declines. The impact of the loss of nest sites on differential declines among closely related spe- uals that differ in their competitive ability and timing of nesting. A range of species following evolutionarily stable cies from very different taxa indicates a new ecological prin- ciple of widespread importance: the effect of habitat degrada- strategies can co-exist when there are sufficient nest sites, but my model predicts that a reduction in nest

Journal

Behavioral Ecology and SociobiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 10, 2017

References

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