Conceptualizing and Measuring Weekend versus Weekday Alcohol Use: Item Response Theory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis

Conceptualizing and Measuring Weekend versus Weekday Alcohol Use: Item Response Theory and... Culturally, people tend to abstain from alcohol intake during the weekdays and wait to consume in greater frequency and quantity during the weekends. The current research sought to empirically justify the days representing weekday versus weekend alcohol consumption. In study 1 (N = 419), item response theory was applied to a two-parameter (difficulty and discrimination) model that evaluated the days of drinking (frequency) during the typical 7-day week. Item characteristic curves were most similar for Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday (prototypical weekday) and for Friday and Saturday (prototypical weekend). Thursday and Sunday, however, exhibited item characteristics that bordered the properties of weekday and weekend consumption. In study 2 (N = 403), confirmatory factor analysis was applied to test six hypothesized measurement structures representing drinks per day (quantity) during the typical week. The measurement model producing the strongest fit indices was a correlated two-factor structure involving separate weekday and weekend factors that permitted Thursday and Sunday to double load on both dimensions. The proper conceptualization and accurate measurement of the days demarcating the normative boundaries of “dry” weekdays and “wet” weekends are imperative to inform research and prevention efforts targeting temporal alcohol intake patterns. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Prevention Science Springer Journals

Conceptualizing and Measuring Weekend versus Weekday Alcohol Use: Item Response Theory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by Society for Prevention Research
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Public Health; Health Psychology; Child and School Psychology
ISSN
1389-4986
eISSN
1573-6695
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11121-016-0685-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Culturally, people tend to abstain from alcohol intake during the weekdays and wait to consume in greater frequency and quantity during the weekends. The current research sought to empirically justify the days representing weekday versus weekend alcohol consumption. In study 1 (N = 419), item response theory was applied to a two-parameter (difficulty and discrimination) model that evaluated the days of drinking (frequency) during the typical 7-day week. Item characteristic curves were most similar for Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday (prototypical weekday) and for Friday and Saturday (prototypical weekend). Thursday and Sunday, however, exhibited item characteristics that bordered the properties of weekday and weekend consumption. In study 2 (N = 403), confirmatory factor analysis was applied to test six hypothesized measurement structures representing drinks per day (quantity) during the typical week. The measurement model producing the strongest fit indices was a correlated two-factor structure involving separate weekday and weekend factors that permitted Thursday and Sunday to double load on both dimensions. The proper conceptualization and accurate measurement of the days demarcating the normative boundaries of “dry” weekdays and “wet” weekends are imperative to inform research and prevention efforts targeting temporal alcohol intake patterns.

Journal

Prevention ScienceSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 3, 2016

References

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