Compliance with anti-human trafficking policies: the mediating effect of corruption

Compliance with anti-human trafficking policies: the mediating effect of corruption Crime Law Soc Change https://doi.org/10.1007/s10611-018-9780-0 Compliance with anti-human trafficking policies: the mediating effect of corruption Cassandra DiRienzo Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018 Abstract Human Trafficking is an atrocious crime that represents a gross assault on human rights and the United Nations states that it is among the fast growing types of criminal activity. Recognizing the need for counteractive measures, in 2000, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and its Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, especially Women and Children (Protocol). Using measures of country compliance with the Protocol, past research offers empirical evidence that corruption is a primary deterrent to compliance. Further, previous field studies and surveys suggest that a greater share of women in government should positively contribute to country compli- ance; however, this result is largely not borne out in empirical studies. It is hypothe- sized that the effect of the share of women in government on compliance is fully mediated by corruption, indicating that there is an indirect effect of women in govern- ment on compliance, rather than a direct effect. This hypothesis is empirically tested using a mediation model and the results http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Crime, Law and Social Change Springer Journals

Compliance with anti-human trafficking policies: the mediating effect of corruption

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature
Subject
Criminology and Criminal Justice; Criminology and Criminal Justice, general; Criminal Law; Political Science; Social Sciences, general
ISSN
0925-4994
eISSN
1573-0751
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10611-018-9780-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Crime Law Soc Change https://doi.org/10.1007/s10611-018-9780-0 Compliance with anti-human trafficking policies: the mediating effect of corruption Cassandra DiRienzo Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018 Abstract Human Trafficking is an atrocious crime that represents a gross assault on human rights and the United Nations states that it is among the fast growing types of criminal activity. Recognizing the need for counteractive measures, in 2000, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and its Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, especially Women and Children (Protocol). Using measures of country compliance with the Protocol, past research offers empirical evidence that corruption is a primary deterrent to compliance. Further, previous field studies and surveys suggest that a greater share of women in government should positively contribute to country compli- ance; however, this result is largely not borne out in empirical studies. It is hypothe- sized that the effect of the share of women in government on compliance is fully mediated by corruption, indicating that there is an indirect effect of women in govern- ment on compliance, rather than a direct effect. This hypothesis is empirically tested using a mediation model and the results

Journal

Crime, Law and Social ChangeSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 4, 2018

References

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