Comparison of protection against H5N1 influenza virus in mouse offspring provided by maternal vaccination with HA DNA and inactivated vaccine

Comparison of protection against H5N1 influenza virus in mouse offspring provided by maternal... H5N1 influenza virus is one of the viruses that can potentially cause an influenza pandemic. Protection of newborns against influenza virus infection could be effectively provided by maternal immunization. In this study, female mice were immunized with H5N1 HA DNA vaccine or inactivated whole-virion vaccine, and the protection provided by maternal antibodies in their offspring against a lethal homologous influenza virus challenge was compared. The results showed that maternal antibodies, whether induced by a DNA vaccine or an inactivated vaccine, could completely protect offspring aged 1-4 weeks from a lethal influenza virus challenge. Breast-feeding was the major route of transfer for maternal antibodies. Milk-derived antibodies were able to effectively protect the offspring aged 1-4 weeks from lethal influenza virus infection, whereas maternal antibodies transferred through the placenta only partially protected the offspring 1-2 weeks of age. The milk- and placenta-transferred IgG2a antibody levels in offspring from their mothers, whether vaccinated with DNA vaccine or inactivated vaccine, were higher than the IgG1 levels. Our results indicated that maternal vaccination with HA DNA, as well as with whole-virion inactivated vaccine, could offer effective protection to offspring against H5N1 influenza virus infection. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Virology Springer Journals

Comparison of protection against H5N1 influenza virus in mouse offspring provided by maternal vaccination with HA DNA and inactivated vaccine

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Springer-Verlag Wien
Subject
Biomedicine; Virology; Medical Microbiology; Infectious Diseases
ISSN
0304-8608
eISSN
1432-8798
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00705-013-1621-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

H5N1 influenza virus is one of the viruses that can potentially cause an influenza pandemic. Protection of newborns against influenza virus infection could be effectively provided by maternal immunization. In this study, female mice were immunized with H5N1 HA DNA vaccine or inactivated whole-virion vaccine, and the protection provided by maternal antibodies in their offspring against a lethal homologous influenza virus challenge was compared. The results showed that maternal antibodies, whether induced by a DNA vaccine or an inactivated vaccine, could completely protect offspring aged 1-4 weeks from a lethal influenza virus challenge. Breast-feeding was the major route of transfer for maternal antibodies. Milk-derived antibodies were able to effectively protect the offspring aged 1-4 weeks from lethal influenza virus infection, whereas maternal antibodies transferred through the placenta only partially protected the offspring 1-2 weeks of age. The milk- and placenta-transferred IgG2a antibody levels in offspring from their mothers, whether vaccinated with DNA vaccine or inactivated vaccine, were higher than the IgG1 levels. Our results indicated that maternal vaccination with HA DNA, as well as with whole-virion inactivated vaccine, could offer effective protection to offspring against H5N1 influenza virus infection.

Journal

Archives of VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 2013

References

  • Gene transfer into muscle by electroporation in vivo
    Aihara, H; Miyazaki, J
  • Bioprocess engineering issues that would be faced in producing a DNA vaccine at up to 100 m 3 fermentation scale for an influenza pandemic
    Hoare, M; Levy, MS; Bracewell, DG; Doig, SD; Kong, S; Titchener-Hooker, N; Ward, JM; Dunnill, P
  • 2009 Influenza A in Infants hospitalized at younger than 6 months
    Lopez-Medina, E; Ardura, MI; Siegel, JD; Brock, E; Sanchez, PJ
  • Seroprevalence of influenza A and B in German infants and adolescents
    Sauerbrei, A; Schmidt-Ott, R; Hoyer, H; Wutzler, P
  • Passive transfer of maternal immunoglobulin isotype antibodies against tetanus and influenza and their effect on the response of foals to vaccination
    Wilson, WD; Mihalyi, JE; Hussey, S; Lunn, DP
  • Superior protection provided by a single dose of MF59-adjuvanted whole inactivated H5N1 influenza vaccine in type 1 diabetic mice
    Wu, J; Wang, F; Fang, F; Zhang, W; Chang, H; Zheng, L; Chen, Z

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