Comparison of early events during infection of human and chimpanzeeperipheral blood mononuclear cells with HIV-1

Comparison of early events during infection of human and chimpanzeeperipheral blood mononuclear... Differences in early events during entry and integration of HIV-1into peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) might contribute to theabsence of AIDS-like disease in chimpanzees as compared to humans. Toaddress this question, we first tested the in vitro susceptibility of humanand chimpanzee PBMC for infection with the two HIV-1 isolates III B andRF. The results of these studies revealed that chimpanzee PBMC had aslightly lower capability to support the growth of HIV-1 as compared tohuman PBMC. This was accompanied by a delayed accumulation of proviral HIV-1 DNA in cultures of HIV-1-infected chimpanzee PBMC. However, nodifferences between cells of the two species were observed when very earlyevents of HIV-1 infection were studied. Shortly (20 h) after infectionchimpanzee and human cells harbored similar amounts of proviral HIV-1 DNA andPBMC of both species behaved comparably with respect to pre-integrationlatency (i.e. the ability to activate extrachromosomal HIV-1 intermediatesin HIV-1 infected quiescent cells at various times after infection). Theseresults strongly suggest that the absence of AIDS-like disease inchimpanzees cannot be correlated with defects in early events of the HIV-1replicative cycle.} http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Virology Springer Journals

Comparison of early events during infection of human and chimpanzeeperipheral blood mononuclear cells with HIV-1

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © Wien by 1998 Springer-Verlag/
Subject
Legacy
ISSN
0304-8608
eISSN
1432-8798
D.O.I.
10.1007/s007050050444
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Differences in early events during entry and integration of HIV-1into peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) might contribute to theabsence of AIDS-like disease in chimpanzees as compared to humans. Toaddress this question, we first tested the in vitro susceptibility of humanand chimpanzee PBMC for infection with the two HIV-1 isolates III B andRF. The results of these studies revealed that chimpanzee PBMC had aslightly lower capability to support the growth of HIV-1 as compared tohuman PBMC. This was accompanied by a delayed accumulation of proviral HIV-1 DNA in cultures of HIV-1-infected chimpanzee PBMC. However, nodifferences between cells of the two species were observed when very earlyevents of HIV-1 infection were studied. Shortly (20 h) after infectionchimpanzee and human cells harbored similar amounts of proviral HIV-1 DNA andPBMC of both species behaved comparably with respect to pre-integrationlatency (i.e. the ability to activate extrachromosomal HIV-1 intermediatesin HIV-1 infected quiescent cells at various times after infection). Theseresults strongly suggest that the absence of AIDS-like disease inchimpanzees cannot be correlated with defects in early events of the HIV-1replicative cycle.}

Journal

Archives of VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Nov 1, 1998

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