Comparative chromosome painting between two marsupials: origins of an XX/XY1Y2 sex chromosome system

Comparative chromosome painting between two marsupials: origins of an XX/XY1Y2 sex chromosome system Cross-species chromosome painting was used to investigate genome rearrangements between tammar wallaby Macropus eugenii (2n = 16) and the swamp wallaby Wallabia bicolor (2n = 10♀/11♂), which diverged about 6 million years ago. The swamp wallaby has an XX female:XY1Y2 male sex chromosome system thought to have resulted from a fusion between an autosome and the small original X, not involving the Y. Thus, the small Y1 should represent the original Y and the large Y2 the original autosome. DNA paints were prepared from flow-sorted and micro-dissected chromosomes from the tammar wallaby. Painting swamp wallaby spreads with each tammar chromosome-specific probe gave extremely strong and clear signals in single-, two-, and three-color FISH. These showed that two tammar wallaby autosomes are represented unchanged in the swamp wallaby, two are represented by different centric fusions, and one by a tandem fusion to make the very long arms of swamp wallaby Chromosome (Chr) 1. The large swamp wallaby X comprises the tammar X as its short arm, and a tandemly fused 7 and 2 as the long arm. The acrocentric swamp wallaby Y2 is a 2/7 fusion, homologous with the long arm of the X. The small swamp wallaby Y1 is confirmed as the original Y by its painting with the tammar Y. However, the presence of sequences shared between the microdissected tammar Xp and Y on the swamp wallaby Y2 implies that the formation of the compound sex chromosomes involved addition of autosome(s) to both the original X and Y. We propose that this involved fusion with an ancient pseudoautosomal region followed by fission proximal to this shared region. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mammalian Genome Springer Journals

Comparative chromosome painting between two marsupials: origins of an XX/XY1Y2 sex chromosome system

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/comparative-chromosome-painting-between-two-marsupials-origins-of-an-70pKMCpYpL
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Cell Biology; Anatomy; Zoology
ISSN
0938-8990
eISSN
1432-1777
D.O.I.
10.1007/s003359900459
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Cross-species chromosome painting was used to investigate genome rearrangements between tammar wallaby Macropus eugenii (2n = 16) and the swamp wallaby Wallabia bicolor (2n = 10♀/11♂), which diverged about 6 million years ago. The swamp wallaby has an XX female:XY1Y2 male sex chromosome system thought to have resulted from a fusion between an autosome and the small original X, not involving the Y. Thus, the small Y1 should represent the original Y and the large Y2 the original autosome. DNA paints were prepared from flow-sorted and micro-dissected chromosomes from the tammar wallaby. Painting swamp wallaby spreads with each tammar chromosome-specific probe gave extremely strong and clear signals in single-, two-, and three-color FISH. These showed that two tammar wallaby autosomes are represented unchanged in the swamp wallaby, two are represented by different centric fusions, and one by a tandem fusion to make the very long arms of swamp wallaby Chromosome (Chr) 1. The large swamp wallaby X comprises the tammar X as its short arm, and a tandemly fused 7 and 2 as the long arm. The acrocentric swamp wallaby Y2 is a 2/7 fusion, homologous with the long arm of the X. The small swamp wallaby Y1 is confirmed as the original Y by its painting with the tammar Y. However, the presence of sequences shared between the microdissected tammar Xp and Y on the swamp wallaby Y2 implies that the formation of the compound sex chromosomes involved addition of autosome(s) to both the original X and Y. We propose that this involved fusion with an ancient pseudoautosomal region followed by fission proximal to this shared region.

Journal

Mammalian GenomeSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 24, 2009

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off