Comparative analysis of reproductive traits in 65 freshwater fish species: application to the domestication of new fish species

Comparative analysis of reproductive traits in 65 freshwater fish species: application to the... Based on an extensive literature search (1,000 references), the objectives of the present study were to establish a numerical clustering of temperate freshwater fish based on their reproductive traits and to evaluate whether it was possible to extrapolate zootechnical knowledge among species belonging to the same cluster. About 65 species were classified into ten homogeneous clusters from the analysis of 29 reproductive traits, among which the most important were temperature during spawning, egg incubation and larval rearing, degree-days for incubation, larval size upon hatching, spawning season, and parental care. From this typology, a rather regular continuum of reproductive clusters emerges with two obvious endpoints. Between these two extremes, species could be ordered chiefly according to temperature requirement, spawning season and parental care. In conclusion, this new typology, differing significantly from all others proposed earlier, may now serve as a possible framework to help enhancing the domestication of new species by comparison to species belonging to the same cluster. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries Springer Journals

Comparative analysis of reproductive traits in 65 freshwater fish species: application to the domestication of new fish species

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Life Sciences; Zoology ; Freshwater & Marine Ecology
ISSN
0960-3166
eISSN
1573-5184
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11160-008-9102-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Based on an extensive literature search (1,000 references), the objectives of the present study were to establish a numerical clustering of temperate freshwater fish based on their reproductive traits and to evaluate whether it was possible to extrapolate zootechnical knowledge among species belonging to the same cluster. About 65 species were classified into ten homogeneous clusters from the analysis of 29 reproductive traits, among which the most important were temperature during spawning, egg incubation and larval rearing, degree-days for incubation, larval size upon hatching, spawning season, and parental care. From this typology, a rather regular continuum of reproductive clusters emerges with two obvious endpoints. Between these two extremes, species could be ordered chiefly according to temperature requirement, spawning season and parental care. In conclusion, this new typology, differing significantly from all others proposed earlier, may now serve as a possible framework to help enhancing the domestication of new species by comparison to species belonging to the same cluster.

Journal

Reviews in Fish Biology and FisheriesSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 18, 2008

References

  • The interrelation of the size of fish eggs, the date of spawning and the production cycle
    Bagenal, TB

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