Community strengths in addressing opioid use in Northeastern Ontario

Community strengths in addressing opioid use in Northeastern Ontario The number of opioid-related deaths in Ontario is rising, and remote First Nations communities face unique challenges in providing treatment for opioid use disorder. Geographic barriers and resource shortages limit access to opioid agonist therapy, such as buprenorphine or methadone. However, attempts to rapidly expand access have the potential to overlook community consultation. Our experience in Moose Factory, Ontario, offers insight into the ethical questions and challenges that can arise when implementing opioid agonist therapy in Northern Ontario and provides an example of how a community working group can strengthen relationships and create a culturally relevant program. We call on medical regulators and the provincial and federal governments to invest in community-based opioid dependence treatment programs that incorporate cultural and land-based healing strategies and draw on First Nations teachings. Résumé Le nombre de décès liés aux opioïdes est en hausse en Ontario, et les communautés éloignées des Premières Nations font face à des difficultés uniques pour traiter les troubles de consommation d’opioïdes. Les obstacles géographiques et la rareté des ressources limitent l’accès au traitement par agonistes opioïdes comme la buprénorphine ou la méthadone. Les tentatives d’élargissement rapide de l’accès risquent toutefois de passer outre aux consultations communautaires. Notre expérience http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Canadian Journal of Public Health Springer Journals

Community strengths in addressing opioid use in Northeastern Ontario

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by The Canadian Public Health Association
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Public Health
ISSN
0008-4263
eISSN
1920-7476
D.O.I.
10.17269/s41997-018-0055-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The number of opioid-related deaths in Ontario is rising, and remote First Nations communities face unique challenges in providing treatment for opioid use disorder. Geographic barriers and resource shortages limit access to opioid agonist therapy, such as buprenorphine or methadone. However, attempts to rapidly expand access have the potential to overlook community consultation. Our experience in Moose Factory, Ontario, offers insight into the ethical questions and challenges that can arise when implementing opioid agonist therapy in Northern Ontario and provides an example of how a community working group can strengthen relationships and create a culturally relevant program. We call on medical regulators and the provincial and federal governments to invest in community-based opioid dependence treatment programs that incorporate cultural and land-based healing strategies and draw on First Nations teachings. Résumé Le nombre de décès liés aux opioïdes est en hausse en Ontario, et les communautés éloignées des Premières Nations font face à des difficultés uniques pour traiter les troubles de consommation d’opioïdes. Les obstacles géographiques et la rareté des ressources limitent l’accès au traitement par agonistes opioïdes comme la buprénorphine ou la méthadone. Les tentatives d’élargissement rapide de l’accès risquent toutefois de passer outre aux consultations communautaires. Notre expérience

Journal

Canadian Journal of Public HealthSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 19, 2018

References

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