Commercial silicate phosphate sequestration and desorption leads to a gradual decline of aquatic systems

Commercial silicate phosphate sequestration and desorption leads to a gradual decline of aquatic... Laboratory desorption behaviour, function and elemental composition of commercially marketed silicate minerals used to sequester phosphorus pollution as well as Zeolite, Smectite, and Kaolinite were determined to see whether their use by environmental scientists and water managers in eutrophic waterways has the potential to contribute to longer-term environmental impacts. As expected, lower phosphorus concentrations were observed, following treatment. However, data relating to desorption, environmental fate and bioavailability of phospho-silicate complexes (especially those containing rare earth elements) appear to be underrepresented in product testing and trial publications. Analysis of desorption of phosphate (P) was > 5 μg[P]/L for all three non-commercial samples and 0 > μg[P]/L > 5 for all commercial silicates for a range of concentrations from 0 to 300 μg[P]/L. Based on a review of bioaccumulation data specific to the endangered Cherax tenuimanus (Hairy Marron) and other endemic species, this is significant considering anything > 20 μg[La]/L is potentially lethal to the hairy marron, other crustaceans and even other phyla. Where prokaryotic and eukaryotic effects are underreported, this represents a significant challenge. Especially where product protocols recommend continual reapplication, this is significant because both the forward and reverse reactions are equally important. The users of silicate minerals in water columns should accept the dynamic nature of the process and pay equal attention to both adsorption and desorption because desorption behaviour is an inherent trait. Even if broader desorption experimentation is difficult, expensive and time-consuming, it is a critical consideration nonetheless. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Science and Pollution Research Springer Journals

Commercial silicate phosphate sequestration and desorption leads to a gradual decline of aquatic systems

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Environment; Environment, general; Environmental Chemistry; Ecotoxicology; Environmental Health; Atmospheric Protection/Air Quality Control/Air Pollution; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution
ISSN
0944-1344
eISSN
1614-7499
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11356-017-0846-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Laboratory desorption behaviour, function and elemental composition of commercially marketed silicate minerals used to sequester phosphorus pollution as well as Zeolite, Smectite, and Kaolinite were determined to see whether their use by environmental scientists and water managers in eutrophic waterways has the potential to contribute to longer-term environmental impacts. As expected, lower phosphorus concentrations were observed, following treatment. However, data relating to desorption, environmental fate and bioavailability of phospho-silicate complexes (especially those containing rare earth elements) appear to be underrepresented in product testing and trial publications. Analysis of desorption of phosphate (P) was > 5 μg[P]/L for all three non-commercial samples and 0 > μg[P]/L > 5 for all commercial silicates for a range of concentrations from 0 to 300 μg[P]/L. Based on a review of bioaccumulation data specific to the endangered Cherax tenuimanus (Hairy Marron) and other endemic species, this is significant considering anything > 20 μg[La]/L is potentially lethal to the hairy marron, other crustaceans and even other phyla. Where prokaryotic and eukaryotic effects are underreported, this represents a significant challenge. Especially where product protocols recommend continual reapplication, this is significant because both the forward and reverse reactions are equally important. The users of silicate minerals in water columns should accept the dynamic nature of the process and pay equal attention to both adsorption and desorption because desorption behaviour is an inherent trait. Even if broader desorption experimentation is difficult, expensive and time-consuming, it is a critical consideration nonetheless.

Journal

Environmental Science and Pollution ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 5, 2017

References

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