Comment on ``Hispanic Population 1990–2000: Growth and Change'', Population Research and Policy Review, Special Issue on the 2000 Census

Comment on ``Hispanic Population 1990–2000: Growth and Change'', Population Research and Policy... Population Research and Policy Review 21: 129–134, 2002. © 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. Comment on “Hispanic Population 1990–2000: Growth and Change”, Population Research and Policy Review, Special Issue on the 2000 Census KAREN A. WOODROW-LAFIELD Mississippi State University Snapshots from censuses capture the panarama of a population’s changes in demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. Censuses have historically compensated for serious gaps in statistical systems, especially valuable with tens of millions of migrants in a world on the move (Stalker 2000). Because the emergent Hispanic population grew quickly from slightly more than two million in 1950 to 35 million in 2000, the U.S. population profiles of 1950, 2000, and 2050 are different on ethnic and racial dimensions (Hollmann et al. 2000). The findings reported about growth of Hispanics over 1990–2000 imply revisions to national population projections by race and Hispanic origin in late 2002. Already, the United States is projected as the lone developed nation among the top twenty countries by 2050, principally from immigration from developing nations, especially Latin American ones (United Nations 2001). Setting aside the myriad implications of this migration for foreign policy and international relations, social scientists and policymakers are pursuing vari- ous http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Population Research and Policy Review Springer Journals

Comment on ``Hispanic Population 1990–2000: Growth and Change'', Population Research and Policy Review, Special Issue on the 2000 Census

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Social Sciences; Demography; Sociology, general; Population Economics
ISSN
0167-5923
eISSN
1573-7829
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1016554020559
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

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