Comment on ``A first look at the 21st Century: Census 2000'', Population and Policy Review, Special Issue: Census 2000

Comment on ``A first look at the 21st Century: Census 2000'', Population and Policy Review,... Population Research and Policy Review 21: 17–18, 2002. © 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. Comment on “A first look at the 21st Century: Census 2000”, Population and Policy Review, Special Issue: Census 2000 CHARLES B. NAM 820 Live Oak Plantation Road, Tallahassee, FL 32312-2413, U.S.A. When I joined the Census Bureau’s staff in 1950 as a GS-5 Junior Pro- fessional, I was told that the census was an ever-changing data-collection instrument in terms of procedures, format, and content. The first census in 1790 was taken by marshals on horseback. They drew up their own census forms, and there were only a few items of information gathered. In subsequent decades, census procedures became increasingly formalized, the schedules were standardized and then mass-produced, and subject items were added progressively. The census in 1950 was indeed significantly different from earlier ones. It was the first to include a sample block of information for a substantial segment of the population, it used new field and office procedures and enhanced post-enumeration inquiries, and it incorporated a wide range of demographic and socioeconomic items (many of them in the sample block). From the perspective of Census 2000, the enumeration of 1950 was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Population Research and Policy Review Springer Journals

Comment on ``A first look at the 21st Century: Census 2000'', Population and Policy Review, Special Issue: Census 2000

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Social Sciences; Demography; Sociology, general; Population Economics
ISSN
0167-5923
eISSN
1573-7829
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1016570416035
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Population Research and Policy Review 21: 17–18, 2002. © 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. Comment on “A first look at the 21st Century: Census 2000”, Population and Policy Review, Special Issue: Census 2000 CHARLES B. NAM 820 Live Oak Plantation Road, Tallahassee, FL 32312-2413, U.S.A. When I joined the Census Bureau’s staff in 1950 as a GS-5 Junior Pro- fessional, I was told that the census was an ever-changing data-collection instrument in terms of procedures, format, and content. The first census in 1790 was taken by marshals on horseback. They drew up their own census forms, and there were only a few items of information gathered. In subsequent decades, census procedures became increasingly formalized, the schedules were standardized and then mass-produced, and subject items were added progressively. The census in 1950 was indeed significantly different from earlier ones. It was the first to include a sample block of information for a substantial segment of the population, it used new field and office procedures and enhanced post-enumeration inquiries, and it incorporated a wide range of demographic and socioeconomic items (many of them in the sample block). From the perspective of Census 2000, the enumeration of 1950 was

Journal

Population Research and Policy ReviewSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 10, 2004

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