Collaborative Findings on Manufacturing Needs for Biofabrication of Engineered Tissues and Organs

Collaborative Findings on Manufacturing Needs for Biofabrication of Engineered Tissues and Organs Since its inception as a field in the late 1990s, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) has struggled to deliver on the promises of transformative medical technologies to repair, replace, or regenerate tissues and organs damaged by disease, congenital defect, age, or trauma. Some stagnation in the TERM field is due to the inability to engage in manufacturing of these products on a large scale and/or with reliability. Unlike small-molecule drugs or medical devices, the technology to create and manufacture TERM products is complex and can be highly variable. One example of this is 3D bioprinting, which is described as the use of three-dimensional (3D) printers to create tissue engineering scaffolds or print tissues and organs with or without live cells. To discuss the issues surrounding large-scale biomanufacturing of TERM products using bioprinting technology, the University of Minnesota held a 1-day workshop on BManufacturing Needs for Biofabrication of Engineered Tissues and Organs^ in conjunction with the annual BDesign of Medical Devices^ conference. Through a series of talks from industry experts and breakout sessions, attendees developed problem statements and next steps for the use of bioprinting in a biomanufacturing process in five areas: unit operations in biomanufacturing, scaling and automation, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Regenerative Engineering and Translational Medicine Springer Journals

Collaborative Findings on Manufacturing Needs for Biofabrication of Engineered Tissues and Organs

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by The Regenerative Engineering Society
Subject
Materials Science; Biomaterials; Regenerative Medicine/Tissue Engineering; Biomedical Engineering
ISSN
2364-4133
eISSN
2364-4141
D.O.I.
10.1007/s40883-018-0062-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Since its inception as a field in the late 1990s, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) has struggled to deliver on the promises of transformative medical technologies to repair, replace, or regenerate tissues and organs damaged by disease, congenital defect, age, or trauma. Some stagnation in the TERM field is due to the inability to engage in manufacturing of these products on a large scale and/or with reliability. Unlike small-molecule drugs or medical devices, the technology to create and manufacture TERM products is complex and can be highly variable. One example of this is 3D bioprinting, which is described as the use of three-dimensional (3D) printers to create tissue engineering scaffolds or print tissues and organs with or without live cells. To discuss the issues surrounding large-scale biomanufacturing of TERM products using bioprinting technology, the University of Minnesota held a 1-day workshop on BManufacturing Needs for Biofabrication of Engineered Tissues and Organs^ in conjunction with the annual BDesign of Medical Devices^ conference. Through a series of talks from industry experts and breakout sessions, attendees developed problem statements and next steps for the use of bioprinting in a biomanufacturing process in five areas: unit operations in biomanufacturing, scaling and automation,

Journal

Regenerative Engineering and Translational MedicineSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 4, 2018

References

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