Climate warming and the arrival of potentially invasive species into boreal forest and tundra in the Hudson Bay Lowlands, Canada

Climate warming and the arrival of potentially invasive species into boreal forest and tundra in... As the extremity of Arctic climate lessens with global warming, the risk of invasion increases. We assess the presence of introduced plant species and their persistence (since the previous survey) in a Canadian subpolar site on the Hudson Bay with a history of human introductions from large-scale grain inputs. Widespread sampling was done to locate all introduced plant species in the Churchill, MB, Canada area. We quantified edaphic variations through soil sampling, and the effect of aspect on introduced species’ richness, cover, and height. At the regional scale, species life history traits and climate envelopes (average and variability of climate in a native range) were established to determine if persistent plant species had similar climate requirements. We found that despite statistically significant warming and increased precipitation, the number of introduced plant species in sub-Arctic Churchill declined from 80 to 36 between the 1989 and 2013 sampling periods. We found that introduced species favor locally warmer, human-disturbed sites with above average soil nutrients. The plant species that remained in Churchill since the 1989 survey compared to those that did not persist are better able to tolerate colder temperatures and have wider, more variable climate envelopes. The decline in introduced species http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Polar Biology Springer Journals

Climate warming and the arrival of potentially invasive species into boreal forest and tundra in the Hudson Bay Lowlands, Canada

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Oceanography; Microbiology; Plant Sciences; Zoology
ISSN
0722-4060
eISSN
1432-2056
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00300-018-2341-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

As the extremity of Arctic climate lessens with global warming, the risk of invasion increases. We assess the presence of introduced plant species and their persistence (since the previous survey) in a Canadian subpolar site on the Hudson Bay with a history of human introductions from large-scale grain inputs. Widespread sampling was done to locate all introduced plant species in the Churchill, MB, Canada area. We quantified edaphic variations through soil sampling, and the effect of aspect on introduced species’ richness, cover, and height. At the regional scale, species life history traits and climate envelopes (average and variability of climate in a native range) were established to determine if persistent plant species had similar climate requirements. We found that despite statistically significant warming and increased precipitation, the number of introduced plant species in sub-Arctic Churchill declined from 80 to 36 between the 1989 and 2013 sampling periods. We found that introduced species favor locally warmer, human-disturbed sites with above average soil nutrients. The plant species that remained in Churchill since the 1989 survey compared to those that did not persist are better able to tolerate colder temperatures and have wider, more variable climate envelopes. The decline in introduced species

Journal

Polar BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 2018

References

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