Circulating level of Th17 cells is associated with sensitivity to glucocorticoids in patients with immune thrombocytopenia

Circulating level of Th17 cells is associated with sensitivity to glucocorticoids in patients... Glucocorticoids are a widely recognized first-line therapy for immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). However, some patients are unresponsive to glucocorticoid therapy for reasons that remain unclear. Accumulating evidence suggests that CD4+ T-cell abnormalities play a crucial role in the development of ITP. In the present study, we investigated peripheral blood CD4+ T cells, Th17-associated cytokines, and the mRNA expression level of Th17 transcription factor—RORγt—in patients with newly-diagnosed ITP before glucocorticoid therapy. The study involved 27 newly-diagnosed patients. Th17-cell levels in the peripheral blood of newly-diagnosed ITP patients were associated with responsiveness to glucocorticoid therapy. Newly-diagnosed ITP patients who were not sensitive to glucocorticoid treatment were found to have lower levels of Th17 cells. Quantifying Th17 cells may allow physicians to predict prognosis of glucocorticoid treatment and stratify therapy for those with ITP. This strategy may provide a new approach to the treatment of glucocorticoid-insensitive patients. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Hematology Springer Journals

Circulating level of Th17 cells is associated with sensitivity to glucocorticoids in patients with immune thrombocytopenia

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by The Japanese Society of Hematology
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Hematology; Oncology
ISSN
0925-5710
eISSN
1865-3774
D.O.I.
10.1007/s12185-017-2392-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Glucocorticoids are a widely recognized first-line therapy for immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). However, some patients are unresponsive to glucocorticoid therapy for reasons that remain unclear. Accumulating evidence suggests that CD4+ T-cell abnormalities play a crucial role in the development of ITP. In the present study, we investigated peripheral blood CD4+ T cells, Th17-associated cytokines, and the mRNA expression level of Th17 transcription factor—RORγt—in patients with newly-diagnosed ITP before glucocorticoid therapy. The study involved 27 newly-diagnosed patients. Th17-cell levels in the peripheral blood of newly-diagnosed ITP patients were associated with responsiveness to glucocorticoid therapy. Newly-diagnosed ITP patients who were not sensitive to glucocorticoid treatment were found to have lower levels of Th17 cells. Quantifying Th17 cells may allow physicians to predict prognosis of glucocorticoid treatment and stratify therapy for those with ITP. This strategy may provide a new approach to the treatment of glucocorticoid-insensitive patients.

Journal

International Journal of HematologySpringer Journals

Published: Jan 11, 2018

References

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