Christopher J. Coyne and Peter T. Leeson, Media, Development, and Institutional Change

Christopher J. Coyne and Peter T. Leeson, Media, Development, and Institutional Change Rev Austrian Econ (2010) 23:419–423 DOI 10.1007/s11138-010-0109-1 Christopher J. Coyne and Peter T. Leeson, Media, Development, and Institutional Change Cheltenham, UK and Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar, 2009 Nicholas Adam Curott Published online: 30 April 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010 Television viewers in Venezuela are accustomed to having their programming interrupted by Hugo Chávez, who regularly broadcasts whatever he feels like on every channel in the nation. To the American visitor, this seems like just one of the many disadvantageous consequences of living under a dictatorship. Converse- ly, the idea that media propaganda propagates dictatorial regimes has been cemented in the popular mind ever since the publication of George Orwell’s 1984. Whichever way one looks at it, media and dictatorship are clearly linked. But is an unfree media a cause of unfree political institutions, or is it a consequence? In the latest entry in the New Thinking in Political Economy book series published by Edward Elgar Press, Christopher J. Coyne and Peter T. Leeson argue convincingly that the arrow of causation in fact runs both ways. According to Coyne and Leeson, the media regularly works to reinforce existing institutions, but it is also a powerful focal point around which http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Review of Austrian Economics Springer Journals

Christopher J. Coyne and Peter T. Leeson, Media, Development, and Institutional Change

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Economics; Public Finance; Political Science; History of Economic Thought/Methodology
ISSN
0889-3047
eISSN
1573-7128
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11138-010-0109-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Rev Austrian Econ (2010) 23:419–423 DOI 10.1007/s11138-010-0109-1 Christopher J. Coyne and Peter T. Leeson, Media, Development, and Institutional Change Cheltenham, UK and Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar, 2009 Nicholas Adam Curott Published online: 30 April 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010 Television viewers in Venezuela are accustomed to having their programming interrupted by Hugo Chávez, who regularly broadcasts whatever he feels like on every channel in the nation. To the American visitor, this seems like just one of the many disadvantageous consequences of living under a dictatorship. Converse- ly, the idea that media propaganda propagates dictatorial regimes has been cemented in the popular mind ever since the publication of George Orwell’s 1984. Whichever way one looks at it, media and dictatorship are clearly linked. But is an unfree media a cause of unfree political institutions, or is it a consequence? In the latest entry in the New Thinking in Political Economy book series published by Edward Elgar Press, Christopher J. Coyne and Peter T. Leeson argue convincingly that the arrow of causation in fact runs both ways. According to Coyne and Leeson, the media regularly works to reinforce existing institutions, but it is also a powerful focal point around which

Journal

The Review of Austrian EconomicsSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 30, 2010

References

  • The new comparative political economy
    Boettke, PJ; Coyne, CJ; Leeson, PT; Sautet, F

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