Chloroplast biotechnology, genomics and evolution: current status, challenges and future directions

Chloroplast biotechnology, genomics and evolution: current status, challenges and future directions Plant Mol Biol (2011) 76:207–209 DOI 10.1007/s11103-011-9792-y PREF ACE Chloroplast biotechnology, genomics and evolution: current status, challenges and future directions • • Jihong Liu Clarke Henry Daniell Jacqueline M. Nugent Published online: 18 May 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011 Although the concept of chloroplast transformation was products, and transgene containment via maternal inheri- developed two decades ago (Daniell et al. 2002; Maliga tance (Daniell et al. 2002; Maliga 2004). Although originally 2004), the enormous biotechnological potential of chloro- confined to tobacco in land plants and to Chlamydomonas in plast transformation has only recently been demonstrated algae, chloroplast transformation has now been achieved in a (Daniell et al. 2005; Bock 2007). This is evident in the wide much wider range of plant species including economically range of products that can be produced in plastids. More than important crops such as soybean, cotton, Brassica species, 100 transgenes have been stably integrated and expressed in potato, tomato, lettuce, sugar beet, eggplant etc. (reviewed the chloroplast genome, including genes coding for indus- by Verma and Daniell 2007; and by Clarke and Daniell in trially valuable enzymes, biomaterials, biopharmaceutical this issue). Despite these major advances in the field major proteins, antibodies, antibiotics, vaccine http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

Chloroplast biotechnology, genomics and evolution: current status, challenges and future directions

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Plant Sciences ; Plant Pathology
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11103-011-9792-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Plant Mol Biol (2011) 76:207–209 DOI 10.1007/s11103-011-9792-y PREF ACE Chloroplast biotechnology, genomics and evolution: current status, challenges and future directions • • Jihong Liu Clarke Henry Daniell Jacqueline M. Nugent Published online: 18 May 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011 Although the concept of chloroplast transformation was products, and transgene containment via maternal inheri- developed two decades ago (Daniell et al. 2002; Maliga tance (Daniell et al. 2002; Maliga 2004). Although originally 2004), the enormous biotechnological potential of chloro- confined to tobacco in land plants and to Chlamydomonas in plast transformation has only recently been demonstrated algae, chloroplast transformation has now been achieved in a (Daniell et al. 2005; Bock 2007). This is evident in the wide much wider range of plant species including economically range of products that can be produced in plastids. More than important crops such as soybean, cotton, Brassica species, 100 transgenes have been stably integrated and expressed in potato, tomato, lettuce, sugar beet, eggplant etc. (reviewed the chloroplast genome, including genes coding for indus- by Verma and Daniell 2007; and by Clarke and Daniell in trially valuable enzymes, biomaterials, biopharmaceutical this issue). Despite these major advances in the field major proteins, antibodies, antibiotics, vaccine

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: May 18, 2011

References

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