Chinese orthographic decomposition and logographic structure

Chinese orthographic decomposition and logographic structure Chinese orthographic decomposition refers to a sense of uncertainty about the writing of a well-learned Chinese character following a prolonged inspection of the character. This study investigated the decomposition phenomenon in a test situation in which Chinese characters were repeatedly presented in a word context and assessed whether the decomposition of a character is related to the boundness of its constituent radicals. Two experiments were conducted to compare differences in the rate of decomposition between two types of LR-character (i.e., such a character consisted of two radicals juxtaposed horizontally). One type was the characters with each character consisting of unbound radicals (i.e., the radicals can stand alone and have their own lexical entries). The other was those with each consisting of bound radicals (i.e., the radicals cannot stand alone and have no lexical entries). Results show that the decomposition of the LR-characters was robust but independent of the boundness and, hence, lexicality of their constituent radicals. This result suggests that the character decomposition is better understood by considering that the link between a visual character and its sound is not direct so that its sound cannot be used to bind its visual details into the gestalt in which the character is perceived, which may finally result in an orthographic decomposition. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reading and Writing Springer Journals

Chinese orthographic decomposition and logographic structure

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/chinese-orthographic-decomposition-and-logographic-structure-oP75h4V8kh
Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Linguistics; Languages and Literature; Psycholinguistics; Education (general); Neurology; Interdisciplinary Studies
ISSN
0922-4777
eISSN
1573-0905
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11145-012-9408-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chinese orthographic decomposition refers to a sense of uncertainty about the writing of a well-learned Chinese character following a prolonged inspection of the character. This study investigated the decomposition phenomenon in a test situation in which Chinese characters were repeatedly presented in a word context and assessed whether the decomposition of a character is related to the boundness of its constituent radicals. Two experiments were conducted to compare differences in the rate of decomposition between two types of LR-character (i.e., such a character consisted of two radicals juxtaposed horizontally). One type was the characters with each character consisting of unbound radicals (i.e., the radicals can stand alone and have their own lexical entries). The other was those with each consisting of bound radicals (i.e., the radicals cannot stand alone and have no lexical entries). Results show that the decomposition of the LR-characters was robust but independent of the boundness and, hence, lexicality of their constituent radicals. This result suggests that the character decomposition is better understood by considering that the link between a visual character and its sound is not direct so that its sound cannot be used to bind its visual details into the gestalt in which the character is perceived, which may finally result in an orthographic decomposition.

Journal

Reading and WritingSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 28, 2012

References

  • An implicit test of Chinese orthographic satiation
    Cheng, C-M; Lan, Y-H

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off