Childhood growth predicts higher bone mass and greater bone area in early old age: findings among a subgroup of women from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study

Childhood growth predicts higher bone mass and greater bone area in early old age: findings among... Osteoporos Int (2017) 28:2717–2722 DOI 10.1007/s00198-017-4048-6 SHORT COMMUNICATION Childhood growth predicts higher bone mass and greater bone area in early old age: findings among a subgroup of women from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study 1,2 1,2 3 1,4 T. M. Mikkola & M. B. von Bonsdorff & C. Osmond & M. K. Salonen & 4,5,6 3,7 8 1,4,9 E. Kajantie & C. Cooper & M. J. Välimäki & J. G. Eriksson Received: 17 October 2016 /Accepted: 10 April 2017 /Published online: 25 April 2017 International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2017 Abstract for corresponding height. Linear regression models were ad- Summary We examined the associations between childhood justed for multiple confounders. growth and bone properties among women at early old age. Results Birth length and growth in height before 7 years of Early growth in height predicted greater bone area and higher age were positively associated with femoral neck area bone mineral mass. However, information on growth did not (p < 0.05) and growth in height at all age periods studied with improve prediction of bone properties beyond that predicted spine bone area (p < 0.01).Growthin heightbeforethe age of by body size at early old age. 7 years http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Osteoporosis International Springer Journals

Childhood growth predicts higher bone mass and greater bone area in early old age: findings among a subgroup of women from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Orthopedics; Endocrinology; Rheumatology
ISSN
0937-941X
eISSN
1433-2965
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00198-017-4048-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Osteoporos Int (2017) 28:2717–2722 DOI 10.1007/s00198-017-4048-6 SHORT COMMUNICATION Childhood growth predicts higher bone mass and greater bone area in early old age: findings among a subgroup of women from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study 1,2 1,2 3 1,4 T. M. Mikkola & M. B. von Bonsdorff & C. Osmond & M. K. Salonen & 4,5,6 3,7 8 1,4,9 E. Kajantie & C. Cooper & M. J. Välimäki & J. G. Eriksson Received: 17 October 2016 /Accepted: 10 April 2017 /Published online: 25 April 2017 International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2017 Abstract for corresponding height. Linear regression models were ad- Summary We examined the associations between childhood justed for multiple confounders. growth and bone properties among women at early old age. Results Birth length and growth in height before 7 years of Early growth in height predicted greater bone area and higher age were positively associated with femoral neck area bone mineral mass. However, information on growth did not (p < 0.05) and growth in height at all age periods studied with improve prediction of bone properties beyond that predicted spine bone area (p < 0.01).Growthin heightbeforethe age of by body size at early old age. 7 years

Journal

Osteoporosis InternationalSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 25, 2017

References

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