Childhood Abuse and Mental Health Problems: Does Gender Matter?

Childhood Abuse and Mental Health Problems: Does Gender Matter? Gender differences in the relationship between mental health problems and childhood abuse have long been of interest to researchers. The purpose of the present study was to examine gender differences in the relationship between childhood abuse and mental health problems among 110 Israeli inmates (50 women and 60 men). The findings indicated that female inmates reported higher prevalence of physical, emotional, and sexual abuse and were more likely to suffer from mental health problems, compared with the male inmates. Additionally, the findings revealed that more female than male inmates had parents with mental health problems. Female inmates who reported mental health problems in their families also reported higher rates of child abuse relative to male inmates with a similar family history. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychiatric Quarterly Springer Journals

Childhood Abuse and Mental Health Problems: Does Gender Matter?

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Psychiatry; Public Health; Sociology, general
ISSN
0033-2720
eISSN
1573-6709
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11126-015-9371-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Gender differences in the relationship between mental health problems and childhood abuse have long been of interest to researchers. The purpose of the present study was to examine gender differences in the relationship between childhood abuse and mental health problems among 110 Israeli inmates (50 women and 60 men). The findings indicated that female inmates reported higher prevalence of physical, emotional, and sexual abuse and were more likely to suffer from mental health problems, compared with the male inmates. Additionally, the findings revealed that more female than male inmates had parents with mental health problems. Female inmates who reported mental health problems in their families also reported higher rates of child abuse relative to male inmates with a similar family history.

Journal

Psychiatric QuarterlySpringer Journals

Published: May 22, 2015

References

  • Incarceration and stratification
    Wakefield, S; Uggen, C

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