Characteristics of Slow Induction Curve of Chlorophyll Fluorescence and CO2 Exchange for the Assessment of Plant Heat Tolerance at Various Levels of Light Intensity

Characteristics of Slow Induction Curve of Chlorophyll Fluorescence and CO2 Exchange for the... The heat tolerance of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and radish (Raphanus sativus L. var. minor) cenoses exposed to elevated and damaging air temperatures (35°C for 20 h, 45°C for 7 h) under photoculture conditions at various levels of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) was assessed by measuring characteristics of the slow induction curve of chlorophyll fluorescence at 682 and 734 nm and the CO2 exchange rate. Irrespective of the illumination level, the exposure of the cenoses to 35°C did not induce irreversible changes in the plant photosynthetic apparatus. The lowest extent of damage to wheat and radish cenoses exposed to 45°C was observed at 150 W/m2 of PAR, whereas the highest damage of the plants was observed at an illumination level that was close to the compensation point of the cenose photosynthesis (50–70 W/m2 of PAR at air temperature of 24°C). Viability index proved to be the most sensitive characteristic, compared to other characteristics, which were determined by measuring the slow phase of fluorescence induction at 682 and 734 nm. In the cenoses studied, the pattern of changes in the viability index in response to a stress factor was close to the changes in the photosynthetic rate. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Springer Journals

Characteristics of Slow Induction Curve of Chlorophyll Fluorescence and CO2 Exchange for the Assessment of Plant Heat Tolerance at Various Levels of Light Intensity

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences
ISSN
1021-4437
eISSN
1608-3407
D.O.I.
10.1023/B:RUPP.0000028674.39572.1c
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The heat tolerance of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and radish (Raphanus sativus L. var. minor) cenoses exposed to elevated and damaging air temperatures (35°C for 20 h, 45°C for 7 h) under photoculture conditions at various levels of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) was assessed by measuring characteristics of the slow induction curve of chlorophyll fluorescence at 682 and 734 nm and the CO2 exchange rate. Irrespective of the illumination level, the exposure of the cenoses to 35°C did not induce irreversible changes in the plant photosynthetic apparatus. The lowest extent of damage to wheat and radish cenoses exposed to 45°C was observed at 150 W/m2 of PAR, whereas the highest damage of the plants was observed at an illumination level that was close to the compensation point of the cenose photosynthesis (50–70 W/m2 of PAR at air temperature of 24°C). Viability index proved to be the most sensitive characteristic, compared to other characteristics, which were determined by measuring the slow phase of fluorescence induction at 682 and 734 nm. In the cenoses studied, the pattern of changes in the viability index in response to a stress factor was close to the changes in the photosynthetic rate.

Journal

Russian Journal of Plant PhysiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 18, 2004

References

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