Characteristics and Gel Properties of Gelatin from Skin of Asian Bullfrog (Rana tigerina)

Characteristics and Gel Properties of Gelatin from Skin of Asian Bullfrog (Rana tigerina) Characteristics and gel properties of gelatin from frog skin as influenced by extraction temperatures (45–75 °C) were investigated. Yield of gelatin increased as the extraction temperature increased (P < 0.05). All gelatins contained α- and β-chains as the predominant components and showed a high imino acid content (215 residues/1000 residues). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra indicated that all gelatin samples had major peaks in amide regions. Gelatin extracted at 55 °C exhibited the highest gel strength (P < 0.05), which was similar to that of commercial bovine gelatin (P > 0.05). Gelling and melting temperatures of frog skin gelatin were 23.47–24.87 and 33.22–34.66 °C, respectively. Gels became more yellowish with increasing extraction temperatures (P < 0.05). All gelatin gels were sponge or coral-like in structure but varied in patterns as visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Gelatin from frog skin could be used as a replacement for land animal counterpart. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food Biophysics Springer Journals

Characteristics and Gel Properties of Gelatin from Skin of Asian Bullfrog (Rana tigerina)

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Chemistry; Food Science; Biological and Medical Physics, Biophysics; Analytical Chemistry
ISSN
1557-1858
eISSN
1557-1866
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11483-017-9485-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Characteristics and gel properties of gelatin from frog skin as influenced by extraction temperatures (45–75 °C) were investigated. Yield of gelatin increased as the extraction temperature increased (P < 0.05). All gelatins contained α- and β-chains as the predominant components and showed a high imino acid content (215 residues/1000 residues). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra indicated that all gelatin samples had major peaks in amide regions. Gelatin extracted at 55 °C exhibited the highest gel strength (P < 0.05), which was similar to that of commercial bovine gelatin (P > 0.05). Gelling and melting temperatures of frog skin gelatin were 23.47–24.87 and 33.22–34.66 °C, respectively. Gels became more yellowish with increasing extraction temperatures (P < 0.05). All gelatin gels were sponge or coral-like in structure but varied in patterns as visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Gelatin from frog skin could be used as a replacement for land animal counterpart.

Journal

Food BiophysicsSpringer Journals

Published: May 15, 2017

References

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