Changes in sugars during rice seed desiccation

Changes in sugars during rice seed desiccation The correlation between desiccation tolerance and soluble sugars was investigated in seeds of a number of rice cultivars belonging to the Asian rice Oryza sativa L. They were dried or ultradried to various low moisture content and then imbibed for germination testing. Few or no changes on germination percentage and vigor index were found in Indian rice seeds even after their moisture content fell to 3.5%, indicating that Indian rice exhibited a strong desiccation tolerance. On the contrary, Japonica rice seed germination percentage rapidly decreased, after their moisture content fell to 4.5%. The capacity for desiccation tolerance in Japonica (cv. Chunjiang 15) and Indian (cv. Zhongzu 1) developing seeds increased on 23–40 and 15–25 days after pollination, respectively. Though the level of monosaccharides declined, the content of sucrose has increased during desiccation. These results suggest that desiccation tolerance might be associated with the increase in seed viability and the changes in sugar level, and that raffinose could be capable of contributing to the desiccation tolerance to ultradrying. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Springer Journals

Changes in sugars during rice seed desiccation

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences; Plant Physiology
ISSN
1021-4437
eISSN
1608-3407
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1021443706020087
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The correlation between desiccation tolerance and soluble sugars was investigated in seeds of a number of rice cultivars belonging to the Asian rice Oryza sativa L. They were dried or ultradried to various low moisture content and then imbibed for germination testing. Few or no changes on germination percentage and vigor index were found in Indian rice seeds even after their moisture content fell to 3.5%, indicating that Indian rice exhibited a strong desiccation tolerance. On the contrary, Japonica rice seed germination percentage rapidly decreased, after their moisture content fell to 4.5%. The capacity for desiccation tolerance in Japonica (cv. Chunjiang 15) and Indian (cv. Zhongzu 1) developing seeds increased on 23–40 and 15–25 days after pollination, respectively. Though the level of monosaccharides declined, the content of sucrose has increased during desiccation. These results suggest that desiccation tolerance might be associated with the increase in seed viability and the changes in sugar level, and that raffinose could be capable of contributing to the desiccation tolerance to ultradrying.

Journal

Russian Journal of Plant PhysiologySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 24, 2006

References

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