Change in antioxidant responses against oxidative damage in black chickpea following cold acclimation

Change in antioxidant responses against oxidative damage in black chickpea following cold... Cold stress is an important factor affecting chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) plants in winter and early spring. We evaluated the effects of cold stress by measuring lipid peroxidation, membrane permeability, and some enzyme activities involved in the ROS-scavenging system under acclimation and non-acclimation conditions in black chickpea Kaka, a popular genotype planted, and accession 4322, as a landrace genotype. Under non-acclimation conditions, the genotype 4322 prevented the H2O2 accumulation more efficiently, which led to a decrease in lipid peroxidation and membrane permeability compared to Kaka. Studying the activities of antioxidant enzymes showed that catalase was more effective enzyme in cell protection against H2O2 in 4322 plants. Such response in acclimated plants was more pronounced than in control and nonacclimated plants. In this study, the increase in guaiacol peroxidase and ascorbate peroxidase activities did not preserve cell membranes from oxidative damage in Kaka plants. It was observed that short-term acclimation can induce greater cold tolerance upon the increase of oxidative stress in chickpea plants. This was due to low levels of MDA and electrolyte leakage index, indicating the lower lipid peroxidation and higher membrane stability under the cold stress compared to non-acclimated plants. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Springer Journals

Change in antioxidant responses against oxidative damage in black chickpea following cold acclimation

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Publisher
SP MAIK Nauka/Interperiodica
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences; Plant Physiology
ISSN
1021-4437
eISSN
1608-3407
D.O.I.
10.1134/S102144371201013X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Cold stress is an important factor affecting chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) plants in winter and early spring. We evaluated the effects of cold stress by measuring lipid peroxidation, membrane permeability, and some enzyme activities involved in the ROS-scavenging system under acclimation and non-acclimation conditions in black chickpea Kaka, a popular genotype planted, and accession 4322, as a landrace genotype. Under non-acclimation conditions, the genotype 4322 prevented the H2O2 accumulation more efficiently, which led to a decrease in lipid peroxidation and membrane permeability compared to Kaka. Studying the activities of antioxidant enzymes showed that catalase was more effective enzyme in cell protection against H2O2 in 4322 plants. Such response in acclimated plants was more pronounced than in control and nonacclimated plants. In this study, the increase in guaiacol peroxidase and ascorbate peroxidase activities did not preserve cell membranes from oxidative damage in Kaka plants. It was observed that short-term acclimation can induce greater cold tolerance upon the increase of oxidative stress in chickpea plants. This was due to low levels of MDA and electrolyte leakage index, indicating the lower lipid peroxidation and higher membrane stability under the cold stress compared to non-acclimated plants.

Journal

Russian Journal of Plant PhysiologySpringer Journals

Published: Feb 26, 2012

References

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