CetSINEs and AREs are not SINEs but are parts of cetartiodactyl L1

CetSINEs and AREs are not SINEs but are parts of cetartiodactyl L1 Short interspersed repetitive elements (SINEs) are widely distributed among the genomes of eukaryotes. We proposed previously that a SINE should be defined by the presence of a region homologous to a tRNA or to 7SL RNA, together with A-box and B-box promoter sequences, in order to distinguish SINEs from other short repetitive sequences, such as short segments of LINEs (long interspersed repetitive elements; Okada et al. Gene 205, 229–243, 1997). Numerous SINE sequences have been deposited to date in DNA databases. In some cases, however, designation of a particular sequence is problematic when the short repetitive sequence has been defined as a SINE without reference to the presence or absence of promoter elements specific for RNA polymerase III. We demonstrate here that four different sequences, namely, ARE1p, ARE2p, CetSINE1, and CetSINE2, each of which has been reported as a SINE, are, in fact, only partial sequences of members of a new subfamily of L1. We also demonstrate that members of this subfamily are distributed specifically among the genomes of cetartiodactyls. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mammalian Genome Springer Journals

CetSINEs and AREs are not SINEs but are parts of cetartiodactyl L1

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by Springer-Verlag New York Inc.
Subject
Life Sciences; Cell Biology; Animal Genetics and Genomics; Human Genetics
ISSN
0938-8990
eISSN
1432-1777
D.O.I.
10.1007/s003350010221
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Short interspersed repetitive elements (SINEs) are widely distributed among the genomes of eukaryotes. We proposed previously that a SINE should be defined by the presence of a region homologous to a tRNA or to 7SL RNA, together with A-box and B-box promoter sequences, in order to distinguish SINEs from other short repetitive sequences, such as short segments of LINEs (long interspersed repetitive elements; Okada et al. Gene 205, 229–243, 1997). Numerous SINE sequences have been deposited to date in DNA databases. In some cases, however, designation of a particular sequence is problematic when the short repetitive sequence has been defined as a SINE without reference to the presence or absence of promoter elements specific for RNA polymerase III. We demonstrate here that four different sequences, namely, ARE1p, ARE2p, CetSINE1, and CetSINE2, each of which has been reported as a SINE, are, in fact, only partial sequences of members of a new subfamily of L1. We also demonstrate that members of this subfamily are distributed specifically among the genomes of cetartiodactyls.

Journal

Mammalian GenomeSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 1, 2000

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