Cerebral blood flow and heart rate variability predict fatigue severity in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

Cerebral blood flow and heart rate variability predict fatigue severity in patients with chronic... Prolonged, disabling fatigue is the hallmark of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Previous neuroimaging studies have provided evidence for nervous system involvement in CFS etiology, including perturbations in brain structure/function. In this arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI study, we examined variability in cerebral blood flow (CBFV) and heart rate (HRV) in 28 women: 14 with CFS and 14 healthy controls. We hypothesized that CBFV would be reduced in individuals with CFS compared to healthy controls, and that increased CBFVand HRV would be associated with lower levels of fatigue in affected individuals. Our results provided support for these hypotheses. Although no group differences in CBFVor HRV were detected, greater CBFV and more HRV power were both associated with lower fatigue symptom severity in individuals with CFS. Exploratory statistical analyses suggested that protective effects of high CBFV were greatest in individuals with low HRV. We also found novel evidence of bidirectional association between the very high frequency (VHF) band of HRV and CBFV. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that CBFV and HRV are potentially important measures of adaptive capacity in chronic illnesses like CFS. Future studies should address these measures as potential therapeutic targets to improve outcomes and reduce http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain Imaging and Behavior Springer Journals

Cerebral blood flow and heart rate variability predict fatigue severity in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Biomedicine; Neurosciences; Neuroradiology; Neuropsychology; Psychiatry
ISSN
1931-7557
eISSN
1931-7565
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11682-018-9897-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Prolonged, disabling fatigue is the hallmark of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Previous neuroimaging studies have provided evidence for nervous system involvement in CFS etiology, including perturbations in brain structure/function. In this arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI study, we examined variability in cerebral blood flow (CBFV) and heart rate (HRV) in 28 women: 14 with CFS and 14 healthy controls. We hypothesized that CBFV would be reduced in individuals with CFS compared to healthy controls, and that increased CBFVand HRV would be associated with lower levels of fatigue in affected individuals. Our results provided support for these hypotheses. Although no group differences in CBFVor HRV were detected, greater CBFV and more HRV power were both associated with lower fatigue symptom severity in individuals with CFS. Exploratory statistical analyses suggested that protective effects of high CBFV were greatest in individuals with low HRV. We also found novel evidence of bidirectional association between the very high frequency (VHF) band of HRV and CBFV. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that CBFV and HRV are potentially important measures of adaptive capacity in chronic illnesses like CFS. Future studies should address these measures as potential therapeutic targets to improve outcomes and reduce

Journal

Brain Imaging and BehaviorSpringer Journals

Published: May 31, 2018

References

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