Cellular specificity and replication rate of Maedi Visna virus in vitro can be controlled by LTR sequences

Cellular specificity and replication rate of Maedi Visna virus in vitro can be controlled by LTR... The long terminal repeats (LTR) sequence divergence among Maedi Visna virus (MVV) isolates leads to LTRs with distinct transcriptional activities, which may result in distinct biological behaviours. The genetic heterogeneity, as well as basal and Tat-induced transcriptional activity of the LTRs from P1OLV and WLC-1 MVV viruses, slow/low and rapid/high isolates, respectively, have been examined and compared with LTRs from other strains of small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV). Transfection assays using a reporter construct containing the LTR fused to a luciferase gene demonstrated that the LTR from P1OLV virus had the weakest promoter activity, suggesting a correlation between the level of promoter activity and the viral replication rate. To confirm this hypothesis, the promoter of P1OLV was cloned into infectious molecular clone KV1772kv72/67 and the resulting chimeric virus was tested for growth in various cell types. Compared to the parental KV1772, the LTR-chimeric virus KV1772/P1OLV exhibited a drastic reduction in replication rate in sheep choroid plexus (SCP) and lung cells, while in ovine macrophages and goat synovial membrane cells (GSM), chimeric virus showed a growth rate similar to that of parental virus. These observations suggest that the LTR is responsible for the slow/low in vitro phenotype presented by P1OLV in SCP and lung cells. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Virology Springer Journals

Cellular specificity and replication rate of Maedi Visna virus in vitro can be controlled by LTR sequences

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Springer-Verlag/Wien
Subject
Biomedicine; Medical Microbiology; Virology; Infectious Diseases
ISSN
0304-8608
eISSN
1432-8798
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00705-004-0436-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The long terminal repeats (LTR) sequence divergence among Maedi Visna virus (MVV) isolates leads to LTRs with distinct transcriptional activities, which may result in distinct biological behaviours. The genetic heterogeneity, as well as basal and Tat-induced transcriptional activity of the LTRs from P1OLV and WLC-1 MVV viruses, slow/low and rapid/high isolates, respectively, have been examined and compared with LTRs from other strains of small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV). Transfection assays using a reporter construct containing the LTR fused to a luciferase gene demonstrated that the LTR from P1OLV virus had the weakest promoter activity, suggesting a correlation between the level of promoter activity and the viral replication rate. To confirm this hypothesis, the promoter of P1OLV was cloned into infectious molecular clone KV1772kv72/67 and the resulting chimeric virus was tested for growth in various cell types. Compared to the parental KV1772, the LTR-chimeric virus KV1772/P1OLV exhibited a drastic reduction in replication rate in sheep choroid plexus (SCP) and lung cells, while in ovine macrophages and goat synovial membrane cells (GSM), chimeric virus showed a growth rate similar to that of parental virus. These observations suggest that the LTR is responsible for the slow/low in vitro phenotype presented by P1OLV in SCP and lung cells.

Journal

Archives of VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Feb 1, 2005

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