Causes of death contributing to changes in life expectancy in New York City between 1983 and 1992

Causes of death contributing to changes in life expectancy in New York City between 1983 and 1992 Recent changes in life expectancy among race and sex groups in New York City were evaluated by analyzing the relative effects of different causes of death in 1983 and 1992, a period in which life expectancy at birth declined by 1.1 years among white males, remained unchanged among black males, and increased 1.2 years among white and black females. Heart disease was found to be the leading cause of death making positive contributions to changes in life expectancy regardless of race or sex, and HIV/AIDS was the leading negative contributor. Overall, deaths from infectious diseases and external causes are becoming more important compared to degenerative conditions in explaining trends in life expectancy in New York City. Past improvements in survival due to reductions in infant deaths are being reversed due to an increase in deaths from preventable causes such as violence and AIDS. Future gains in longevity may require a greater emphasis on policies and programs emphasizing conflict resolution and HIV prevention. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Population Research and Policy Review Springer Journals

Causes of death contributing to changes in life expectancy in New York City between 1983 and 1992

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Social Sciences; Demography; Sociology, general; Population Economics
ISSN
0167-5923
eISSN
1573-7829
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1005720325109
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Recent changes in life expectancy among race and sex groups in New York City were evaluated by analyzing the relative effects of different causes of death in 1983 and 1992, a period in which life expectancy at birth declined by 1.1 years among white males, remained unchanged among black males, and increased 1.2 years among white and black females. Heart disease was found to be the leading cause of death making positive contributions to changes in life expectancy regardless of race or sex, and HIV/AIDS was the leading negative contributor. Overall, deaths from infectious diseases and external causes are becoming more important compared to degenerative conditions in explaining trends in life expectancy in New York City. Past improvements in survival due to reductions in infant deaths are being reversed due to an increase in deaths from preventable causes such as violence and AIDS. Future gains in longevity may require a greater emphasis on policies and programs emphasizing conflict resolution and HIV prevention.

Journal

Population Research and Policy ReviewSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 29, 2004

References

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