Carer Characteristics and Health, Wellbeing and Employment Outcomes of Older Australian Baby Boomers

Carer Characteristics and Health, Wellbeing and Employment Outcomes of Older Australian Baby Boomers Supporting caregivers and enabling continued workforce participation are central strategies in Australia’s response to an ageing population, however these strategies have potential disadvantages for carers, particularly women, including reduced workforce participation and retirement income, and poorer health status. This paper explores the nexus between paid work and caregiving for Australia’s baby boomer cohort as this group faces unprecedented pressures to manage paid work alongside caring longer and more intensively for family members, including grandchildren. A sample of 1261 men and women aged 60 to 64 completed the 2011–12 Life Histories and Health survey, a sub-study of the New South Wales 45 and Up Study. The survey collected data on sociodemographic, psychosocial, life history and health-related variables including caregiving and employment status. Around a third (32.5%) of the sample (52.2% female) were involved in some type of caregiving at the time. Compared to non-carers, carers reported lower workforce participation (45.8% versus 54.7% for non-carers) as well as poorer health, more mobility difficulties, lower quality of life and lower self-rated SES. Carers who also cared for grandchildren were more likely to be in part-time or no paid work compared to other carers. Working carers tended to be more highly educated, have fewer mobility difficulties, better self-rated health and higher SES than non-working carers. Male carers were more likely than female carers to be in full-time or no paid work. Results indicate that reduced workforce participation and health status of caregivers varies by gender and type of caregiving. Policy reforms are recommended to mitigate these adverse consequences on those providing care, their families, employers and the community. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology Springer Journals

Carer Characteristics and Health, Wellbeing and Employment Outcomes of Older Australian Baby Boomers

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Social Sciences; Aging; Anthropology; Philosophy of Medicine; Geriatrics/Gerontology; Theory of Medicine/Bioethics
ISSN
0169-3816
eISSN
1573-0719
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10823-017-9321-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Supporting caregivers and enabling continued workforce participation are central strategies in Australia’s response to an ageing population, however these strategies have potential disadvantages for carers, particularly women, including reduced workforce participation and retirement income, and poorer health status. This paper explores the nexus between paid work and caregiving for Australia’s baby boomer cohort as this group faces unprecedented pressures to manage paid work alongside caring longer and more intensively for family members, including grandchildren. A sample of 1261 men and women aged 60 to 64 completed the 2011–12 Life Histories and Health survey, a sub-study of the New South Wales 45 and Up Study. The survey collected data on sociodemographic, psychosocial, life history and health-related variables including caregiving and employment status. Around a third (32.5%) of the sample (52.2% female) were involved in some type of caregiving at the time. Compared to non-carers, carers reported lower workforce participation (45.8% versus 54.7% for non-carers) as well as poorer health, more mobility difficulties, lower quality of life and lower self-rated SES. Carers who also cared for grandchildren were more likely to be in part-time or no paid work compared to other carers. Working carers tended to be more highly educated, have fewer mobility difficulties, better self-rated health and higher SES than non-working carers. Male carers were more likely than female carers to be in full-time or no paid work. Results indicate that reduced workforce participation and health status of caregivers varies by gender and type of caregiving. Policy reforms are recommended to mitigate these adverse consequences on those providing care, their families, employers and the community.

Journal

Journal of Cross-Cultural GerontologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 13, 2017

References

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