Capsular contracture in subfascial breast augmentation: recommendations and treatment

Capsular contracture in subfascial breast augmentation: recommendations and treatment Capsular contracture is the most common long-term complication of breast augmentation. In subfascial breast augmentation, there had been reports of 0% to 2% of capsular contracture (Serra-Renom et al., Plast Reconstr Surg 116:640–645; Ventura and Marcello, Aesthetic Plast Surg 29:379–383; Tijerina et al., Aesthetic Plast Surg 34:16–22; Graf et al., Plast Reconstr Surg 111(2):904–908). Graf et al. mentioned a 2.3% of capsular contracture grade II in 263 patients that underwent subfascial breast augmentation (Graf et al., Plast Reconstr Surg 111(2):904–908). There are several theories that can explain the presence of a capsular contracture, and the most described are: the microbiology theory and the contamination of the pocket due to a foreign body (Araco et al., Plast Reconstr Surg 124(6): 1808–1819; Schaub et al., Plast Reconstr Surg 126(6): 2140–2149). In 5 years, 35 patients with breast augmentation were considered for surgical treatment for capsular contracture. From 35 patients, only 4 patients were operated by us initially, the remaining 31 came to us as new patients with a capsular contracture. Each patient had different characteristics and was classified with the Baker scale. Depending on the grade (I–IV) and clinical characteristics of the patient, the surgical treatment was selected between a subcapsular pocket, total capsulectomy with or without implant, or radiation of the capsule. Thirty-five patients were considered for surgical treatment for a capsular contracture. All of our patients had great outcome at short and long term without any signs of complications. Twenty-seven patients were followed for 2 years postop, and 8 patients treated with a subcapsular pocket have less than 2 years of follow-up. In patients with less mammary gland tissue, a subcapsular pocket had reduced the risk of complications of a total capsulectomy due to close relationship between the skin and the capsule. There are several complications that could be present with a total capsulectomy, which are: tissue necrosis, breast irregularities, and/or damage to the skin. This technique had produced great results in patients with lo mammary tissue and a capsular contracture. Capsular contracture is the most common long-term complication in breast augmentation. There are several techniques that can be reproduced to have better outcomes and reduce the risk of complications. We recommend the use of these strategies to help in the treatment of capsular contracture. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Plastic Surgery Springer Journals

Capsular contracture in subfascial breast augmentation: recommendations and treatment

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/capsular-contracture-in-subfascial-breast-augmentation-recommendations-LSE0Ij29nM
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Plastic Surgery
ISSN
0930-343X
eISSN
1435-0130
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00238-011-0682-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Capsular contracture is the most common long-term complication of breast augmentation. In subfascial breast augmentation, there had been reports of 0% to 2% of capsular contracture (Serra-Renom et al., Plast Reconstr Surg 116:640–645; Ventura and Marcello, Aesthetic Plast Surg 29:379–383; Tijerina et al., Aesthetic Plast Surg 34:16–22; Graf et al., Plast Reconstr Surg 111(2):904–908). Graf et al. mentioned a 2.3% of capsular contracture grade II in 263 patients that underwent subfascial breast augmentation (Graf et al., Plast Reconstr Surg 111(2):904–908). There are several theories that can explain the presence of a capsular contracture, and the most described are: the microbiology theory and the contamination of the pocket due to a foreign body (Araco et al., Plast Reconstr Surg 124(6): 1808–1819; Schaub et al., Plast Reconstr Surg 126(6): 2140–2149). In 5 years, 35 patients with breast augmentation were considered for surgical treatment for capsular contracture. From 35 patients, only 4 patients were operated by us initially, the remaining 31 came to us as new patients with a capsular contracture. Each patient had different characteristics and was classified with the Baker scale. Depending on the grade (I–IV) and clinical characteristics of the patient, the surgical treatment was selected between a subcapsular pocket, total capsulectomy with or without implant, or radiation of the capsule. Thirty-five patients were considered for surgical treatment for a capsular contracture. All of our patients had great outcome at short and long term without any signs of complications. Twenty-seven patients were followed for 2 years postop, and 8 patients treated with a subcapsular pocket have less than 2 years of follow-up. In patients with less mammary gland tissue, a subcapsular pocket had reduced the risk of complications of a total capsulectomy due to close relationship between the skin and the capsule. There are several complications that could be present with a total capsulectomy, which are: tissue necrosis, breast irregularities, and/or damage to the skin. This technique had produced great results in patients with lo mammary tissue and a capsular contracture. Capsular contracture is the most common long-term complication in breast augmentation. There are several techniques that can be reproduced to have better outcomes and reduce the risk of complications. We recommend the use of these strategies to help in the treatment of capsular contracture.

Journal

European Journal of Plastic SurgerySpringer Journals

Published: Jul 1, 2012

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off