Can 3-D Printed Gypsum Samples Replicate Natural Rocks? An Experimental Study

Can 3-D Printed Gypsum Samples Replicate Natural Rocks? An Experimental Study 3D printing is an emerging technology which can offer valuable insight into rock characterization and theoretical model verification due to the sample reproducibility. Also, it will allow for the samples to be built at various scales with controlled geometries and specification to facilitate different types of analysis. In this study, gypsum powder was used for printing blindly to evaluate if mechanical and pore network characteristics of the specimens would resemble a natural rock. For this purpose, cylindrical specimens with different sizes were manufactured without inputting any pore network CT digital image of a natural rock. The objective was to study mechanical properties and deformation behavior of such samples by conducting a series of uniaxial compressive strength tests. Scanning electron microscope was utilized to characterize the microstructures of rock matrix prior to and after the experiments were performed. By determining the representative element area and image processing techniques, the surface porosity of 3-D printed samples was measured to be 5.8%. The analysis of pore size and shape distribution demonstrated the dominance of intermediate pore size as the main feature. This study enabled us to propose a new classification criterion for the pore shape based on printing procedures. Additional microstructural elements, micro-fractures, in particular, were identified, analyzed and classified into three separate categories, including intrapore micro-fracture, interpore micro-fracture and micro-fracture perforating pores. Finally, this study compared the mechanical properties and microstructure of 3D printed gypsum samples with typical natural rocks, also revealed the limitations in 3-D printing and suggested printing materials should be chosen, specific to the goal of the research study. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering Springer Journals

Can 3-D Printed Gypsum Samples Replicate Natural Rocks? An Experimental Study

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/can-3-d-printed-gypsum-samples-replicate-natural-rocks-an-experimental-lZYZUhv2QD
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Earth Sciences; Geophysics/Geodesy; Civil Engineering
ISSN
0723-2632
eISSN
1434-453X
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00603-018-1520-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

3D printing is an emerging technology which can offer valuable insight into rock characterization and theoretical model verification due to the sample reproducibility. Also, it will allow for the samples to be built at various scales with controlled geometries and specification to facilitate different types of analysis. In this study, gypsum powder was used for printing blindly to evaluate if mechanical and pore network characteristics of the specimens would resemble a natural rock. For this purpose, cylindrical specimens with different sizes were manufactured without inputting any pore network CT digital image of a natural rock. The objective was to study mechanical properties and deformation behavior of such samples by conducting a series of uniaxial compressive strength tests. Scanning electron microscope was utilized to characterize the microstructures of rock matrix prior to and after the experiments were performed. By determining the representative element area and image processing techniques, the surface porosity of 3-D printed samples was measured to be 5.8%. The analysis of pore size and shape distribution demonstrated the dominance of intermediate pore size as the main feature. This study enabled us to propose a new classification criterion for the pore shape based on printing procedures. Additional microstructural elements, micro-fractures, in particular, were identified, analyzed and classified into three separate categories, including intrapore micro-fracture, interpore micro-fracture and micro-fracture perforating pores. Finally, this study compared the mechanical properties and microstructure of 3D printed gypsum samples with typical natural rocks, also revealed the limitations in 3-D printing and suggested printing materials should be chosen, specific to the goal of the research study.

Journal

Rock Mechanics and Rock EngineeringSpringer Journals

Published: May 28, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off