Calcium influx signals normal flagellar RNA induction following acid shock of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

Calcium influx signals normal flagellar RNA induction following acid shock of Chlamydomonas... Acid shock of Chlamydomonas results in flagellar excision and induction of flagellar protein RNAs. The magnitude of flagellar RNA accumulations after flagellar excision by mechanical shear depends on the extracel]ular Ca2+ concentration. In this report, we demonstrate that the magnitude and duration of flagellar RNA accumulations are signaled by an acid shock-induced Ca2+ influx. RNA accumulations were greater in cells acid shocked in 500 µM CaCl2 than in 200 µM CaCl2, although the accumulation durations were similar. RNA accumulations of lower magnitude and shorter duration were observed in cells in Ca2+-containing buffer treated with CdCl2. RNA accumulations were of still lower magnitude and shorter duration in cells shocked in buffer without added CaCl2 than in cells shocked in 200 or 500 µM CaCl2 or in the presence of CdCl2. RNA accumulations similar to those in cells shocked in buffer without added CaCl2 were measured in cells following acid shock in buffer containing 200 µM CaCl2 and supplemented with neomycin, ruthenium red, or LaCl3. Acid shock of the adf-1 mutant resulted in RNA accumulations of shorter duration and lower magnitude than those measured in adf-1 cells stimulated by mechanical shear. These results are consistent with an hypothesis that acid shock generates two genetically and pharmacologically distinct signals governing flagellar RNA induction; the first signal is independent of a Ca2+ influx and flagellar excision and results in low magnitude accumulations of short duration, and the second is a consequence of a Ca2+ influx and results in accumulations of high magnitude and long duration. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

Calcium influx signals normal flagellar RNA induction following acid shock of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/calcium-influx-signals-normal-flagellar-rna-induction-following-acid-yzXX1IziE4
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Plant Sciences; Plant Pathology
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1005727806897
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Acid shock of Chlamydomonas results in flagellar excision and induction of flagellar protein RNAs. The magnitude of flagellar RNA accumulations after flagellar excision by mechanical shear depends on the extracel]ular Ca2+ concentration. In this report, we demonstrate that the magnitude and duration of flagellar RNA accumulations are signaled by an acid shock-induced Ca2+ influx. RNA accumulations were greater in cells acid shocked in 500 µM CaCl2 than in 200 µM CaCl2, although the accumulation durations were similar. RNA accumulations of lower magnitude and shorter duration were observed in cells in Ca2+-containing buffer treated with CdCl2. RNA accumulations were of still lower magnitude and shorter duration in cells shocked in buffer without added CaCl2 than in cells shocked in 200 or 500 µM CaCl2 or in the presence of CdCl2. RNA accumulations similar to those in cells shocked in buffer without added CaCl2 were measured in cells following acid shock in buffer containing 200 µM CaCl2 and supplemented with neomycin, ruthenium red, or LaCl3. Acid shock of the adf-1 mutant resulted in RNA accumulations of shorter duration and lower magnitude than those measured in adf-1 cells stimulated by mechanical shear. These results are consistent with an hypothesis that acid shock generates two genetically and pharmacologically distinct signals governing flagellar RNA induction; the first signal is independent of a Ca2+ influx and flagellar excision and results in low magnitude accumulations of short duration, and the second is a consequence of a Ca2+ influx and results in accumulations of high magnitude and long duration.

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Sep 29, 2004

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off