Calcium-Based Interactions of Symbiotic Partners in Legumes: Role of Peribacteroid Membrane

Calcium-Based Interactions of Symbiotic Partners in Legumes: Role of Peribacteroid Membrane Based on experimental evidence, a concept is formulated that mutualistic relationships between pro- and eukaryotic cells during nitrogen-fixing legume–rhizobia symbiosis rely both on selective transfer of metabolites and ion transport, Ca2+ in particular, across the peribacteroid membrane (PBM). PBM in the nitrogen-fixing cells of yellow lupine (Lupinus luteus L.) and broad bean (Vicia faba L.) is endowed with a calcium-translocating ATPase that pumps Ca2+ into the symbiosome. This pumping ensures, on the one hand, calcium homeostasis in the cytosol of infected plant cells and, on the other hand, it optimizes Ca2+ level in symbiosomes, first of all in the bacteroids, because Ca2+ is one of the main factors controlling their nitrogenase activity. The balance between the symbiotic partners and the maintenance of optimal Ca2+ level in the bacteroids also depends on passive Ca2+ efflux from symbiosomes to the plant cell cytosol via calcium channels. The Ca2+-transporting mechanisms residing at PBM are characterized. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Springer Journals

Calcium-Based Interactions of Symbiotic Partners in Legumes: Role of Peribacteroid Membrane

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences
ISSN
1021-4437
eISSN
1608-3407
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1024789227513
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Based on experimental evidence, a concept is formulated that mutualistic relationships between pro- and eukaryotic cells during nitrogen-fixing legume–rhizobia symbiosis rely both on selective transfer of metabolites and ion transport, Ca2+ in particular, across the peribacteroid membrane (PBM). PBM in the nitrogen-fixing cells of yellow lupine (Lupinus luteus L.) and broad bean (Vicia faba L.) is endowed with a calcium-translocating ATPase that pumps Ca2+ into the symbiosome. This pumping ensures, on the one hand, calcium homeostasis in the cytosol of infected plant cells and, on the other hand, it optimizes Ca2+ level in symbiosomes, first of all in the bacteroids, because Ca2+ is one of the main factors controlling their nitrogenase activity. The balance between the symbiotic partners and the maintenance of optimal Ca2+ level in the bacteroids also depends on passive Ca2+ efflux from symbiosomes to the plant cell cytosol via calcium channels. The Ca2+-transporting mechanisms residing at PBM are characterized.

Journal

Russian Journal of Plant PhysiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 11, 2004

References

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