Britholite-group minerals as sensitive indicators of changing fluid composition during pegmatite formation: evidence from the Keivy alkaline province, Kola peninsula, NW Russia

Britholite-group minerals as sensitive indicators of changing fluid composition during pegmatite... The Keivy alkaline province, Kola Peninsula, NW Russia, consists of vast alkali granite massifs and several dike-like nepheline syenite bodies. It contains numerous rare-metal occurrences, formed by a complex sequence of magmatic, late-magmatic and post-magmatic (including pegmatitic) processes. The Sakharjok nepheline syenite pegmatite contains a remarkably diverse number of britholite group minerals, pointing to different physico-chemical conditions in the fluid. REE and actinides distribution in the host rock indicates that the late-magmatic (and pegmatitic) fluids were alkaline, with significant amounts of F and CO2. From REE and F variations of the britholite group minerals possible fluid compositions at different stages are suggested. The earliest fluorbritholite-(Ce) formed locally from a late magmatic, high temperature F-rich fluid. Fluorbritholite-(Y) presumably crystallized from a F-bearing and CO2-rich fluid; marked F saturation resulted in precipitation of abundant fluorite due to a temperature drop. Variations in REE and F contents in the most abundant fluorcalciobritholite indicate a successive decrease of F in the fluid during its evolution. The relationship between intergrown fluorapatite and fluorcalciobritholite and the presence of zones with a REE-rich fluorapatite between them indicate a continuous to sudden crystallization in this mineral sequence. The сrystallization of the latest “calciobritholite” is related to the input into the fluid of CO2 and/or H2O. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mineralogy and Petrology Springer Journals

Britholite-group minerals as sensitive indicators of changing fluid composition during pegmatite formation: evidence from the Keivy alkaline province, Kola peninsula, NW Russia

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/britholite-group-minerals-as-sensitive-indicators-of-changing-fluid-nTlo6bP52u
Publisher
Springer Vienna
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag Wien
Subject
Earth Sciences; Mineralogy; Inorganic Chemistry; Geochemistry
ISSN
0930-0708
eISSN
1438-1168
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00710-017-0493-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Keivy alkaline province, Kola Peninsula, NW Russia, consists of vast alkali granite massifs and several dike-like nepheline syenite bodies. It contains numerous rare-metal occurrences, formed by a complex sequence of magmatic, late-magmatic and post-magmatic (including pegmatitic) processes. The Sakharjok nepheline syenite pegmatite contains a remarkably diverse number of britholite group minerals, pointing to different physico-chemical conditions in the fluid. REE and actinides distribution in the host rock indicates that the late-magmatic (and pegmatitic) fluids were alkaline, with significant amounts of F and CO2. From REE and F variations of the britholite group minerals possible fluid compositions at different stages are suggested. The earliest fluorbritholite-(Ce) formed locally from a late magmatic, high temperature F-rich fluid. Fluorbritholite-(Y) presumably crystallized from a F-bearing and CO2-rich fluid; marked F saturation resulted in precipitation of abundant fluorite due to a temperature drop. Variations in REE and F contents in the most abundant fluorcalciobritholite indicate a successive decrease of F in the fluid during its evolution. The relationship between intergrown fluorapatite and fluorcalciobritholite and the presence of zones with a REE-rich fluorapatite between them indicate a continuous to sudden crystallization in this mineral sequence. The сrystallization of the latest “calciobritholite” is related to the input into the fluid of CO2 and/or H2O.

Journal

Mineralogy and PetrologySpringer Journals

Published: Jan 19, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off